Adventures in hiking…

Posts tagged “Yosemite National Park

Yosemite – A National Treasure That Will Capture Your Soul

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Liberty Cap and Nevada Falls

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul alike.   John MuirThe Yosemite (1912)

Thank you Abraham Lincoln for signing the Yosemite Grant Act in 1864.  This laid the foundation for others to preserve the beauty and sanctity of Yosemite National Park, which was established in 1872.

I think Yosemite is the crown jewel of the Sierras.  It is a land of majesty, iconic mountains, with ancient forests, waterfalls and endless vistas.  In Yosemite Valley one can experience the four seasons. In spring, the melting snow makes the water burst from the mountains with a roaring thunder that resonates in your bones.   In summer, the ground floor of the valley is bustling with flowers and tourists seeking views of Half Dome, El Capitan, Yosemite Falls and the Mist Trail.   Fall in the valley provides a glorious display of the deciduous flora in its fullness. Winter is a quieter time where you can take leisurely strolls while catching glimpses of snow-capped peaks in the distance.

Hetch Hetchy Reservoir

Hetch Hetchy Reservoir

John Muir captured the essence of this land through his writings.   After visiting the park  a couple of times,  I read My First Summer in the Sierra and The Yosemite.  Walking through Tuolumne Meadows, dipping my feet in the Merced River and experiencing the enveloping mist of Nevada Falls – this is where he walked.  Awakening to the sun cresting behind Cathedral, drifting through the moraine fields near Lembert Dome and listening to the gurgling Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne River are but a few memories that I will take with me.  It is a respite that you will cherish long after you go home.  While at work, my mind drifts to thepanorama of the Hetch-Hetchy Reservoir and how it must have looked 100 years ago before they built the O’Shaughnessy Dam.

I see the Almighty’s  handiwork in the granite sentinels surrounding the valley.  They beckon me to venture higher and explore further the miles of trails.  Yosemite Park is a place of rest, a refuge from the roar and dust and weary, nervous, wasting work of the lowlands, in which one gains the advantages of both solitude and society. Nowhere will you find more company of a soothing peace-be-still kind.  – John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938)

I am blessed to live within a day’s drive of Yosemite.  If you ever make it to California, this should be the first stop on your list of destinations.  Venture into the valley, wade in the Merced River and drive the Tioga Road where the views at Olmsted Point will make you want to linger.   Stroll down to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias and notice the Steller’s Jays as they follow you along the path, flitting from tree to tree.   Savor the waving blue lupines hanging on the edge of a precipice near Yosemite Falls.  Is it strange to fall in love with a place?  Spend some time here and you may come away with a desire to write poetry. 🙂

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.  John MuirOur National Parks, (1901)

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On the John Muir Trail, Yosemite

 

I’m thankful for John Muir and the love he held for The Yosemite.  He was a true visionary who inspired others to cherish and become good stewards of this national treasure.  Come see for yourself and experience this gem.


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 5 – Tuolumne to Lower Cathedral Lake

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Lower Lake Cathedral outlet is one of many that feed Tenaya Lake 1,300 ft. below.

“Going to the mountains is going home.”
― John Muir

On July 4th, we decided to take a pseudo-zero day and hike up to Lower Cathedral Lake where we would relax.  We passed by the Tuolumne Grill in the a.m. and got a wonderful bacon, egg and cheese biscuit.  A quick shuttle to the Cathedral trailhead and we began the relatively short 3.5 mile hike to Lower Cathedral Lake.  Short yes, easy no.  (I left out the part where I almost took out a tourist’ eye on the shuttle with my hiking pole.)  Lesson learned:  When getting on the shuttles/buses, wear your pack, don’t try to carry it.

This is probably the most popular trail with day hikers in the Tuolumne area.  As you near the lake you enter into a meadow and are in the shadow of Cathedral Peak.  There are several creeks feeding the lake.  Most day hikers stop on the eastern shore; we would continue on the north side of the lake and head west to the far end.   We were rewarded with a lakefront campsite and plenty of solitude.  Tip – get there early in the day for your choice of sites.

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After setting up our camp and eating lunch, we did chores.  My brother took one of his waterproof clothing bags and filtered some lake water.  Oila, a washing machine!   Dump the dirty water at least 100 ft. away from the lake and fill the bag with clean filtered water for rinsing.  It was labor intensive, but the clothes came out smelling clean.  We used  Dr. Bronner’s biodegradable Magic Soap and it was great.   I’ve used the peppermint soap in the past which can be used for bathing too.  A clothesline between two dead trees and we were set.  One biohazard Mary discovered was that the bees liked the aroma of the lavender soap on the clothes while they dried.   I had some insect bite/sting paste in my 1st aid kit that does wonders for those stings.  

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Enjoying the sunset on Lower Cathedral Lake.

At the far end of Lower Cathedral Lake, the water is warmer in the shallows of the shore.  No fish in this lake that we could see.  We ventured to the western edge where the lake’s outlet is and viewed Tenaya Lake 1,300 ft. below.   The flows from Cathedral are one of many that make their way to the glacier made Tenaya.   The Yosemite Indians actually called it Pywiack, meaning shining rock.  The white man renamed it Tenaya after the Indian chief who fled here from soldiers one spring.

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Sunset on Cathedral Peak

We would enjoy the remainder of our day at Lower Cathedral.  Our Independence Day celebration concluded with fireworks presented by God.  The sky to the west of the lake was most spectacular.  I highly recommend spending the night here.  Bring mosquito head nets and some bug repellant, as it can get a bit buggy.

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Now this is a 4th of July show.

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As the world turned during our peaceful night, the sun would greet us by silhouetting Cathedral. What a glorious place.

Tomorrow, we are determined to put in some mileage.  Tonight, we would sleep soundly in the quiet surroundings of another lake.

Links to a slide show of the hike:

Part I: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

Part II http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7zHwNLPY6A

John says it best:  ….Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on seas and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.

– John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938), page 438.


Yosemite In The Spring – Part I

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Vernal Falls, May 2012

When my friend asked me to go camping in Yosemite this spring, it took about two seconds to say yes.  Each season in this place promises to provide a different perspective on the ever-changing landscape.  This was an opportunity to hang out with him and his family and do a few day hikes in the valley.  With the upcoming Memorial Day holiday, the campsites were full.  These things fill up quickly with all variety of campers.  From ultralight tents like mine, to tent-condos and vintage RVs, you will see them all.  Not one to enjoy being around throngs of people, I found the car camping experience in the Upper Pines Campground to be very decent.  Most people are good neighbors and obey the multitude of rules.  Other than the 0730 trash trucks, it was fairly peaceful.

Merced River & Vernal Falls

Pollen is abundant in the valley and the conifers were producing it in vast amounts.  Hay fever sufferers, beware – get your shots and/or bring your antihistamines with you.  Diligence with your food and toiletries is required while camping here as the vermin are quite adept at the snatch and grab, especially the ravens and squirrels.  My friends watched as a squirrel disappeared under a neighbors truck with the doors open;  the rascal emerged with food in a matter of seconds.  He went right for the boxed graham crackers, found the bag, eaten through the box and extracted his morsels before they knew what hit them.  I love animals, but thought back to what I would have done as a kid in this campground.  A sling shot would have been awesome.

At night, the muted roar of the Merced River beckoned me as I drifted off to sleep that first night.  Soon, I would venture out with my friends on a trek to Nevada Falls via the Mist Trail.  Having done this cardio extravaganza in the fall of 2010, I was excited to see the volume of water during the spring snow melt.  I read in the Backpackers magazine that 90% of hikers hike only 10% of the trails in Yosemite.  Well, I think that 99% of the visitors to Yosemite hang out in the valley and then go to Vernal Falls.  Crowds aside, the steady climb up to Vernal is rewarded with the drenching mist probably similar to Niagara.  The granite steps would give a stair-master competition.  The one thing that kept me going was the humility of having an old person pass me up on the steps.  At the top, the volume of water is near flood stage compared to the previous fall flow that I witnessed.

Nevada Falls

The trail continued up to Nevada where you cross the Merced and I was in awe of the speed of the water as it rushed through a shallow granite track into a 90 degree curve.  The sheer power of the current is amazing.  You get a respite from the incline and then start a steep ascent over the manmade steps.   This section of the trail is a testament to the trail builders over the years.  The huge slabs are cut and fit together like a puzzle.

Looking west from Nevada Falls.

Nevada Falls was busy, but there was plenty of room to spread out.  This cascade seems even more powerful than Vernal because the water is funneled through a crevice that is maybe 6-8 ft. across.   The roar and subsequent plunge is impressive.  Glacier Point fills the western vista and hawks lazily glided around the nearby Liberty Cap.  Even with all the people, it was peaceful to lay back and take it all in.

Nevada Falls from the John Muir Trail

The walk down the John Muir Trail is always a treat.  As you progress down, you get quick showers from above and obtain postcard views of Half Dome, Liberty Cap and Nevada Falls.   This is a shared trail and we encountered a couple of riders on a mule and quarter horse.  It can get slippery as the sand covered rocks keep you alert as you try to prevent rolling your ankles.  We returned via the JMT to the Mist Trail down to the valley floor.

At just under 7 miles, this loop is a good workout, full of killer views.  Due to the crowds in the spring, I would recommend a late start – like after 1 or 2 in the afternoon.   The risk with an afternoon hike is the occasional thunderstorm. Most  people start up around 0900.  Half Dome bound hikers pass by this way and it’s worth the stop.

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God certainly knew what he was doing when he created this place.  It’s best enjoyed with family and friends.


Yosemite in the Fall Part IV: The Mist Trail

Waterfalls have a special allure to us.  Not sure why, maybe it’s just the sheer display of power.  During this time of year in Yosemite, the volume of water is fairly low.  Still, recent rains provided life to Yosemite Falls, so there was hope that Vernal and Nevada would put on a show for us.

This hike started on the valley floor as we parked in the Day Use area and walked the relatively flat couple of miles to the Mist Trail.  We would pass the campgrounds where people were just waking up and cooking their breakfast.  The smell of bacon wafted on the air as we passed by.  I imagined a tall stack of pancakes with maple syrup and, oh I’m sorry this is a blog about hiking not food.  Hiking just makes me hungry.

Early morning is the best time to start a hike, it is a different experience.  The first part of the trail was asphalt and you got the feeling that you were in a municipal park somewhere.   It gradually became a steady incline.  You could hear the Merced River and occasionally get a peek at it as you make your way up.  We crossed a footbridge with our first good view of the river as it made its way down the canyon.  The sound of the water rushing over boulders was getting louder the closer we came to the falls.  The path became less structured and the effects of erosion were evident.  The sound intensity of the falls gradually increased as did the incline on the trail.

Soon, we could see slabs of rock carved out that was to be our path to the top.  It was like the stair-stepper from hell.  Often, you were almost crawling to get to the next slab.  The closer you got, the wetter the rocks were.  It was exciting and a bit disconcerting if you thought about what would happen if you would trip.  We paused to take some pics, now noticing the mist from the falls.  I imagine that at full flow, you would be drenched as you made your way through here.  The last set of steps would be a narrow path cut out of the cliff with a railing to hold on to.

Looking down the "steps" near Vernal Falls.

The area at the top of Vernal Falls has railings that will allow you to get within a few feet of the falls.  The precipitous drop looked radical.  Within a year, several more people would die here – being swept over the falls as they foolishly climbed over the railing.   The water actually wasn’t that deep near the falls, but boy was it swift.  We would have our lunch here as the ground squirrels bravely made their way to your feet for the crumbs.  Ever the mischievous one, I threw a few breadcrumbs at Mary’s feet to see how close they would get.

After lunch, we started making our way to Nevada Falls.  Most people would turn around here and head down.  We ran into a couple and the man asked us if we had something to fix his shoe.  I looked at his shoe, the bottom was flopping around like a beaver’s tail.  After laughing at his predicament, I gave him some rope and he secured the sole.  They took some souvenir pics with us and we continued up.  On the way up, we were passed by a group of young German guys.  The hike through the forest was peaceful with the leaves changing, the leaves bright green,yellow and orange.

Between Vernal and Nevada Falls in October.

We came to an opening and the falls popped into view.  Thinking that we were close, we noticed that the top of the falls were actually a couple of hundred feet higher.  The path there was another crawl over even steeper steps that required a break every 3-4 minutes.  Well, at least there were steps.

Nevada Falls

The top of Nevada Falls really opens up like one huge slab of granite with a river running through it.  There was a stiff breeze that would take your hat off.  The sound of the falls was intense, like mega white noise.  You had to yell to hear each other.

We spent some time checking out the area which we had to ourselves.  So the trick is get on the trail late in the day, by early noon most of the people were gone.  Of course in the summer with thunderstorms around the afternoon, this wouldn’t be a good plan.  We would cross the Merced River over a footbridge.  It took a little while to see where the trail picked up, but soon the John Muir Trail came into view.  It was a nice descent down to the valley floor.  A good 8 miles from where we parked and 1,900 ft. of elevation gain.  This combo is a good cardio workout with some excellent scenery.  But hey, where in Yosemite is the scenery not excellent?

Nevada Falls and Liberty Cap as seen from the John Muir Trail.

This hike would be the last on this trip to Yosemite.  Our goal is to be up here at least once during each of the four seasons.  The Sierras take on a different character during each.  Can you imagine snowshoeing to Sentinel Rock at night during a full moon?  I can!  Enjoy life friends, God has blessed you more than you could imagine.  Get out and see what He has created.