Adventures in hiking…

Posts tagged “Tuolumne

Yosemite – A National Treasure That Will Capture Your Soul

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Liberty Cap and Nevada Falls

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul alike.   John MuirThe Yosemite (1912)

Thank you Abraham Lincoln for signing the Yosemite Grant Act in 1864.  This laid the foundation for others to preserve the beauty and sanctity of Yosemite National Park, which was established in 1872.

I think Yosemite is the crown jewel of the Sierras.  It is a land of majesty, iconic mountains, with ancient forests, waterfalls and endless vistas.  In Yosemite Valley one can experience the four seasons. In spring, the melting snow makes the water burst from the mountains with a roaring thunder that resonates in your bones.   In summer, the ground floor of the valley is bustling with flowers and tourists seeking views of Half Dome, El Capitan, Yosemite Falls and the Mist Trail.   Fall in the valley provides a glorious display of the deciduous flora in its fullness. Winter is a quieter time where you can take leisurely strolls while catching glimpses of snow-capped peaks in the distance.

Hetch Hetchy Reservoir

Hetch Hetchy Reservoir

John Muir captured the essence of this land through his writings.   After visiting the park  a couple of times,  I read My First Summer in the Sierra and The Yosemite.  Walking through Tuolumne Meadows, dipping my feet in the Merced River and experiencing the enveloping mist of Nevada Falls – this is where he walked.  Awakening to the sun cresting behind Cathedral, drifting through the moraine fields near Lembert Dome and listening to the gurgling Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne River are but a few memories that I will take with me.  It is a respite that you will cherish long after you go home.  While at work, my mind drifts to thepanorama of the Hetch-Hetchy Reservoir and how it must have looked 100 years ago before they built the O’Shaughnessy Dam.

I see the Almighty’s  handiwork in the granite sentinels surrounding the valley.  They beckon me to venture higher and explore further the miles of trails.  Yosemite Park is a place of rest, a refuge from the roar and dust and weary, nervous, wasting work of the lowlands, in which one gains the advantages of both solitude and society. Nowhere will you find more company of a soothing peace-be-still kind.  – John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938)

I am blessed to live within a day’s drive of Yosemite.  If you ever make it to California, this should be the first stop on your list of destinations.  Venture into the valley, wade in the Merced River and drive the Tioga Road where the views at Olmsted Point will make you want to linger.   Stroll down to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias and notice the Steller’s Jays as they follow you along the path, flitting from tree to tree.   Savor the waving blue lupines hanging on the edge of a precipice near Yosemite Falls.  Is it strange to fall in love with a place?  Spend some time here and you may come away with a desire to write poetry. 🙂

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.  John MuirOur National Parks, (1901)

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On the John Muir Trail, Yosemite

 

I’m thankful for John Muir and the love he held for The Yosemite.  He was a true visionary who inspired others to cherish and become good stewards of this national treasure.  Come see for yourself and experience this gem.


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 4 – Donahue Pass to Tuolumne Meadows

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Lyell Canyon

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul.”
― John Muir

This day should have been called “The Race to Tuolumne”.  It was July 3rd and we were trying to make it to the Tuolumne post office to retrieve our resupply package before it closed at 4. While a stop in Tuolumne Meadows would be nice, we didn’t want to spend the holiday on the 4th waiting around for a package.

Tuolumne Meadows is a great place to hang out, but a zero day around the Cathedral Lakes would be ideal.  Getting our usual late start, we were on the trail and looking forward to the flat paths of Lyell Canyon.  We had to drop around 500 ft. and enjoyed the relative shade of the pines as we followed the river.

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A pregnant doe grazing in the forest

We noticed a large deer grazing in the distance.  It was a pregnant doe who kept one eye on us, but wasn’t very concerned.  These creatures have few predators in Yosemite.

As the terrain flattened out, we picked up the pace and the sun was beaming down.  It was hot as the path meandered in and out of the forest.  To our left, Amelia Earhart Peak loomed over us.  We would see this ridge from another angle as the trail would do a horseshoe after Tuolumne.  Distant rumblings of early afternoon thunderstorms were behind  and to the west of us.  We passed an area where day hikers from Tuolumne had gathered around a nice area on the river.  The number of people increased as we closed in on Tioga Road.

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As we neared Tuolumne, the thunder was more frequent and louder.  A fairly close crack of thunder prompted us to spread out a bit as we picked up the pace.  Occasional large splatters of rain filtered down through the pines.  We crossed a couple of foot-bridges where the Lyell Fork neared the main branch of the Tuolumne River.  We emerged in the parking lot near the lodge and started walking down the road.  It was strange to be in civilization after days on the trail.

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A local worker from the Tuolumne Meadows store graciously gave us a ride to the post office.  As we pulled into the parking area, the scene was chaotic.  Tourists and hikers were like ants swarming around the store.  It took a few minutes to absorb the busy surroundings.  Near the road was a collection of picnic tables where thru-hikers lounged around.  A family sat at one of the tables listening to a PCT hiker expound on his trail life.   It was like storytime at the preschool.  Other hikers were going through their resupply packages.

We would get some refreshments and pick up our packages at the window.  The post office here was a small room with a window on the outside of the store.  The clerk was friendly and politely asked if we could open our packages over where the thru-hikers were.  We obliged, and noticed the grill.  The thought of  cheeseburgers and fries was too much.  We gave in to our cravings and enjoyed the greasy goodness.  Mmmmm.

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Tuolumne Store, Post Office, Grill. (photo credit-tahoewhitney.com)

We made our way to the backpackers camp.  It’s first come first serve and $5 per camper.  We found out how many hikers are moochers and “stealth camp”.  You know the ones who are too cheap to pay the fee.  Bathrooms are at a premium here – only one within walking distance of the camp and it was uber-busy.  Bring a flashlight, no electricity in these rustic restrooms.

At 8:00 p.m. a ranger hosts a campfire in the amphitheater near the backpacker’s camp. Ranger Sally provided an excellent presentation of Yosemite history and we learned a lot about owls.  We really enjoyed hanging out and laughing at other campers who participated in the campfire.

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One of 7 sunrises.

Even though Tuolumne Meadows was much lower in altitude than our previous campsites, it was the coolest night yet.  Temps dipped into the 40’s as we snuggled deep in our sleeping bags.  Tomorrow, we would head up to Cathedral and enjoy some downtime.

For a slideshow of the part 1 of the hike, you can go here:

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg