Adventures in hiking…

Posts tagged “Maine 100 Mile Wilderness

Appalachian Trail – 100 Mile Wilderness – The Last Day

Sunrise on Rainbow Lake.

The weather for this trip was mostly awesome.  Sunny, clear skies, temperature in the 70’s.  I imagined how much harder this would have been if it had been raining.  The bogs would have become swamps, instead of rock hopping across streams, we would have been fording.  We began our 8th day earlier than usual on the shores of Rainbow Lake.  With 7 miles to Abol Bridge, we were ready to finish this marathon.

Making our breakfast, we would hop out on a rock and eat on Rainbow Lake.  The water was like glass, the air still.  The sun had not yet climbed over the trees. The quiet enveloped us and the solitude was remarkable.

All I want is a cheeseburger.

Packing up, we hit the trail by 6:30 or so.  Only one more “hill” to climb and one more lean-to.   While the trail wasn’t as difficult as the first 50 miles, it wasn’t a walk in the park either.  As we walked, our talk turned to food again – our favorite fast-foods and desserts.  We both agreed that cheeseburgers were from angels and that we were going to get one after we emerged from this moss encrusted forest.  The miles clicked by slowly on my GPS, each 1/10 of a mile taking forever.  It probably wasn’t a good idea watching the mileage on my Garmin, kinda like watching water boil in a pot.

Truly an unforgiving trail.

We would climb to Rainbow Ledges, a slow steady incline that threatened to sap our last energy reserves.  This would be the 12th mountain, maybe the 13th in one week.  After a false summit, we would reach the plateau, a collection of granite slabs with blueberry bushes everywhere.  They weren’t quite ready to eat,  so we just admired the view of Katahdin.   We pressed on and the trail seemed to turn into a rock garden.

Rainbow Ledges, Mt. Katahdin hiding in the distance.

As we crossed one of the last brooks, we arrived at the Hurd Stream Lean-To.  This would be one of the first lean-to’s if you were a So-Bo on the A.T.  It was in fairly rough shape and looked small and uncomfortable.  I just can’t get into the spirit of the lean-to’s.

As we continued on, we realized that we were within a few miles of Abol Bridge.  We picked up the pace and took one more break on a big boulder in the middle of the trail.  A So-Bo approached and said “You know, there is ice cold Coke and ice cream at Abol Bridge”.  We all laughed because  we probably looked pretty bad with our muddy, sweat soaked clothes and gaunt faces.   We had one last snack and were determined to finish the last leg.  About two miles from the end, something in me snapped and all I thought about was a cheeseburger.  I ran past Joe who had been in the lead for 99% of this hike singing the praises of Jimmy Buffet’s “Cheeseburger in Paradise”   You know the tune.  The look on Joe’s face was one of confusion and humor.  Now, I was walking twice as fast as he, sometimes running as my pack and I were one.  I would stay in the lead until the end.

Still thinking about food and in a daze, I looked up and saw some people who I recognized heading southbound, but it didn’t click who they were.  It was Joe’s family who hiked 5 minutes down the A.T. to meet us.  We were happy to see them and enjoyed seeing someone we actually knew.  We walked to the last sign before exiting the wilderness and took our last pics.

Mission complete, it felt weird to emerge into civilization.  In the past week, we had walked for approximately 95-100 hours, taken over 250,000 steps, endured approximately 30,000 ft. of elevation change, crossed countless brooks and streams, walked across several miles of logs and planks, and  hopped thousands of boulders.  We never fell into a stream, into a bog, or down a hill.  We came close but were blessed with an accident-free adventure.

Mission Complete. Last sign in the wilderness near Abol Bridge.

Oh yes, within a few hours I would have my cheeseburger.  Sadly, my stomach had shrunk and I couldn’t even finish it.

My gear: Deuter ACT Lite 65+10 Backpack – Emerald/Anthracite A nice lightweight backpack that is tough as nails.  A waterproof cover can be purchased separately.


Appalachian Trail – The 100 Mile Wilderness – Day 1

Sunset on Jo-Mary Lake, in the 100 Mile Wilderness, Maine.

By the third day, I would ask God ” Lord what have I gotten myself into?”  My epic adventure into the 100 Mile Wilderness may have been the greatest physical and mental challenge to date.   What follows is a description of the first day I spent hiking the most remote and arguably the toughest 100 mile section of the Appalachian Trail.

The “A.T.” as it is commonly known to hikers, is a 2,184 mile marked hiking trail.  It extends from Springer Mountain, Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine.  Every year, approximately 2,000 people attempt to hike the entire trail and are known as thru-hikers  About 20-25% actually complete the 5-6 month journey.  Most people hike northbound and try to make it before October.  About 10% start in Maine and work their way down to Georgia.   My friend Joe and I did a section hike of the A.T.  We would start in the last trail town – Monson, Maine.

The beginning of our northbound journey.

My preparation for this hike was pretty basic.   Strengthen my legs and cardio endurance.  Do day hikes on the weekend for 8-10 miles and run after work in the hills of Camp Pendleton.  I knew that I should hike with a 40-45 lb pack to simulate the load, but it was such a pain to do it.  This decision not to practice with a loaded pack  would significantly impact my journey into the wilderness.

Joe and I have hiked Yosemite and discussed section hiking the A.T. We tossed around the idea of doing a section in North Carolina or Virginia, since he transferred to the east coast this year.  The idea of the 100 Mile Wilderness in Maine came up and we were quickly sold on it.  The logistics made the decision easier.  His family lived about 2 hours from the A.T. trailhead in Monson.  We did some calculations and decided at 14+ miles per day, we could complete the section in 7 days.  Little did we know that this timeframe is a stretch and only the best of the hikers make it through that quickly.

We discussed supplies, calculated the weight of each item and determined that we would need approximately 12-14 lbs of food to safely traverse the wilderness.   The Maine Appalachian Trail Club (MATC) advises 10 days of food for the hike.  With 3.5 liters of water, my pack weighed in at 46-47 lbs.   Each day, I would hope to shed some of the weight by eating my food.  With my pack, the load on my small frame was around 215 lbs.  On this trip, I would use my SPOT GPS messenger to notify our families where we were and that we were ok at least once a day.  It’s a one way messenger that is used to communicate your position or as an emergency beacon.

Joe’s family drove us to the trailhead and walked the first 100 yards or so to the sign indicating the seriousness of what we were going to attempt.  Their enthusiasm and encouragement made us excited to get started.  We could hardly believe that the time had come.  We started around 11:30 a.m.  A pond near the beginning was an omen of things to come.  Making our way deeper into the forest, the sounds of Highway 15 gradually faded with distance.  The canopy of the deciduous trees enveloped us and we realized that we were entering the “green tunnel” of the Appalachian Trail.

Joe enters into the “green tunnel”.

The terrain was rocky, full of roots and hilly.  Up and down, this would be the norm for the week.  The forest was still damp even though there had not been significant rain for a couple of weeks.  Bogs with planks and rocks would slow our pace even more.  We would not see too many vistas on the first day and it was tough getting a GPS signal through the trees.  Stopping at the Little Wilson Stream late in the day, we would have lunch/dinner near a nice cascade.  We would cross here only having to double back because the trail actually follows the stream for a bit.

Following the “white blazes” that defined the A.T., we would see them on trees and rocks every 50-100 feet.  Without these, it would be difficult – especially at night to stay on course.

The “white blaze” of the A.T. would keep us on course.

Crossing the Little Wilson. We would have to double back since this wasn’t the right place to cross

Daylight seemed to fade quickly under the thick canopy.  We checked out the map and determined that we could make it to the Big Wilson Stream by nightfall.  Joe would continue to hike with his built-in night vision eyes, while I would put on my headlamp to tackle my first serious attempt at night hiking.

The Big Wilson Stream

We found an established campsite next to the stream and each began our chores.  Mine – to collect and filter the water, send out our “OK” GPS message, and start a fire.  Joe’s – to set up the tent.  Starting the fire was very hard.  All the wood and kindling was wet.  The fire never amounted to much, but was ok, because within 30 minutes of setting up the tent, we were hitting the sack.  A 9 hr. hiking day and only covered approximately 9.5 miles.   Tomorrow, we would ford across the Big Wilson.     Zzzzzzzzzzz……….