Adventures in hiking…

Posts tagged “Idyllwild

San Jacinto Wilderness – Devil’s Slide to Tahquitz Loop

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It’s been over a year since the Mountain Fire consumed over 27,000 acres in the San Bernardino National Forest in Riverside County.  As a result, some of the trails in the San Jacinto range and some of the Pacific Crest Trail are closed indefinitely.  The cause of the fire was attributed to electrical equipment failure on private property.  Fortunately, no lives were lost.  Since last fall’s hike on Fuller Ridge, we haven’t been back in the San Jacinto area.  We love to hike up here in the summer because you can usually escape the hotter temps in the valleys below.

Today, we would venture out on Devil’s Slide and hit Saddle Junction  From there, we would see which trails were open.  On the weekends, this is a popular trail so the recommendation is to come early or start late (around noon).  Humber Park is a popular area to picnic and the Earnie Maxwell trail is a 2.6 mile one way shuttle hike for a nicer walk in the park.   Parking in Humber Park requires an adventure pass.  For the Devil’s Slide trail, you will need to pick up a permit at the ranger’s station in Idyllwild.

I usually check the weather forecast when we hike. Now, a tropical storm off the Baja Peninsula was pumping in moisture to the desert regions east with subsequent scattered thunderstorms in the mountains.   One thing about hiking, the longer you do it, the better you get at understanding the weather.   The cumulus clouds were definitely about, but were spread out and not building into thunder-cells.

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Well now, looks like the cumulus clouds got together.

The trail up Devil’s Slide is well maintained, wide – with a mix of dirt, granite and some sand and scree.   It gains a steady 500 ft. or so for the first mile and then you get switchbacks that are around 700 ft. per mile.  It’s a steady climb with nice views of Suicide Rock and Lily Rock, both favorites for local climbers.  You can hear them calling out to each other as you head up.

Unfortunately, this has been a low snow year so the trail is totally dry.  If you want to find water sources in the wilderness, watch for bees.  They seek out moisture and will actually pull water out of moist dirt that usually has a water source underneath.  They often will take the water back to the queen to cool her down.  I love nature.

After 2.5 miles, we reached Saddle Junction and most of the trails were roped off by the USFS.  The Mountain Fire did impact a large area, but many mature trees survived because the fire was not as intense.   Some species of pines in this area have bark that is 3-5 inches thick.  It’s like armor and protects the conifers from the heat.

We took one of two available trails toward Tahquitz Valley, hoping that we could work our way toward Law’s Camp a few miles away which has decent views of the desert.  After a half mile or so, we would run into some volunteer ranger’s and I automatically gave them my permit.  The people who volunteer are usually locals that love this area and are a big asset to the Forest Service.  They check permits, clean up trash and seek out illegal campsites or fire rings.  Often, they assist with search and rescue.  We had a nice conversation with them and were on our way again.  We came to another junction and unfortunately, the trails to the north were closed so we went into Tahquitz Valley toward Tahquitz Peak.

IMG_3117We were rewarded with a display of colorful ferns.  Some were orange and yellow, probably due to the lack of rain, but it seemed like fall foliage to us.  We had the trail to ourselves for the next few hours as most people stopped at the junction or went straight to the peak.  The trail meandered through the forest passing a couple of remote campsites.  These would be nice if there was water around.  Otherwise, you’ll need to bring it in like a camel.

One of the volunteer rangers mentioned that thunderstorms were due in around 3 p.m.  We pushed up the last 500 ft. just past the Tahquitz Peak junction and wandered out to an outcropping for views of Lily Rock and the valley where we would take a late lunch break.  Good thing too, because I hit the classic wall where I was out of energy.  Many long distance hikers experience this frequently where they just run out of steam.   For them, trying to stay ahead of the calorie deficit is the key.  For us occasional day hikers, it’s a matter of eating a decent breakfast and snacking along the way.

We heard one group pass on their way to the peak and then the first rumbles of thunder.  I looked around to see the source and the cumulus clouds were gathering to our south and moving north towards us.  We finished up and began a fairly quick retreat down the mountain.  Unfortunately, the first mile or so was parallel to the storm so we didn’t make much headway, but ended up getting out of harms way fairly quickly.  I found out later that the storm dumped several inches of rain with hundreds of lightning strikes to our south and east.  Did you know lightning can strike 20+ miles away from a storm?  We took the opportunity to talk about lightning safety and what actions we would take.  Feel a tingling on the back of your neck or arms?  Drop those poles and squat near the ground ASAP.  Don’t touch the ground though.

Anyhow, hike long enough and you are bound to get wet and/or experience lightning.   Be prepared and have a plan.  Pack a rain-pancho or raincoat – you can get hypothermia even in the summer.  Avoid peaks and summits in thunderstorm conditions around the noon to early afternoon hours.

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In summary, the Devil’s Slide trail to Saddle Junction is fairly limited for the time being due to the fire, but take the loop to Tahquitz Peak as it is a worthwhile trek.  The views from the peak and the Lily Rock canyon are stellar.   You’ll log around 9.5-9.7 miles on this walkabout.  Take at least 2-3 liters of water with you, there’s none to be found this time of year. Hike on……


Marion Mountain Trail to San Jacinto Summit. JMT, We are Ready.

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U.S.D.A. Identifier: Marion Mountain Trail-2E14

Type of trail: Out and back, composition: sand, decomposed granite, soft soil, rocks, pine straw

Distance as hiked: 12.5 miles

Approximate elevation: Trailhead-6,400ft., Top of trail-10,834ft.

Temps:75-90 degrees

Difficulty: strenuous

The last time we hiked Marion Mountain Trail was in April/May of 2012.  Snow covered a good portion of the trail above 8,000 ft, and we only made it to the junction.  It is known as one of the shortest and steepest routes to the summit of San Jacinto.

We took my brother on this hike as a warm up for the JMT at the end of the month.  this is a challenging trail with difficult terrain.  You must keep a sharp eye out for the path as it gets tricky.

Less than half a mile into today’s hike, I came within a foot of a Pacific rattler, who warned me in the nick of time.  My hiking pole was inches away from his tail.  I backed away slowly to allow this 4-5 foot adult make his way up the slope.  Close encounters with rattlers gets the adrenaline going.   The color and pattern of this one blended in perfectly with the trail.   While I’ve had over a dozen encounters with rattlers in my few years of hiking, this was the closest.  Our altitude was approx. 6,700 ft.  In my observation, snakes are rarely seen above 8,000 ft. in the San Bernardino Mountains.  It made me more cautious the rest of the day and I also took the time to brief my hiking partners on how we would handle a poisonous snake bite situation.

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Crossing paths with a 4-5 foot Pacific Rattler.

After snapping a few photos of this viper, we focused on our journey to the summit.  The trail wastes no time in elevation gain as it climbs out at over 900 ft. per mile.   The short switchbacks and rocky, sandy trail makes for a calf and quad burning extravaganza.

Due to the lack of snowfall last winter, the vernal streams are fewer and water flows much less.  The first significant stream was around 9,300-9,400 ft., and probably feeds into the tiny San Jacinto River.  The temps stayed in the 80’s for much of this trek and we were using up our water faster than predicted.  There were a couple of other streams where a someone with a pump could extract some water.

Sometimes, I question why we do these tough hikes.  Marion Mtn is one of the hardest ones around.  It’s really mind over matter because it isn’t always fun.  It does build confidence in the sense that once you put your mind to something,  you can conquer it.  Besides, if you always hiked on flat terrain it would be boring.

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We took many breaks today due to the heat and intensity of the trail.  We started feeling the possible symptoms of mild acute mountain sickness (AMS) around 9,000 ft.  To compensate, a motrin and increased fluid intake helped, as well as slowing the ascent.   Symptoms may include nausea, light-headedness and a mild headache.  We kept an eye on this and agreed to head back down if the symptoms did not go away.  AMS is nothing to play around with and is important to recognize it as it can lead to a more serious condition.  You can read about it here: http://www.altitude.org/altitude_sickness.php

We took a lunch break at the junction of the PCT/Marion Mtn/Seven Pines trails.  From the junction, you enter a heavily wooded area for 1/2 mile and begin a steady climb that is exposed to afternoon sun.  The trail is rocky with occasional shade under some conifers. We continued on to Little Round Valley campground.  It is a nice area with private campsites less than a mile to the summit.  The nearby vernal stream  was pretty much dry, so I recommend you top off at the stream about 700-800 yds before camp on the ascent.

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We broke out into a clearing with signs that pointed us to the summit and points to the tram, Wellman’s Divide, Deer Springs Trail and Humber Park.  The views to several 10,000+ peaks and the desert below are beautiful.

No hike to San Jacinto is complete without stopping by the summit cabin.  The last 200 ft. to the summit are spent scrambling up boulders and around the flora.  At the top, we saw several others – not too bad.  Sometimes, you can run in to 30 or 40 people crowded around the sign.  It was 5:30 by then, so that might have something to do with it.

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We started down by 6 p.m. knowing that it was going to be a close call on darkness.  I have to admit, this trail is no easier going down  since you have to pick your way around the rocks and scree.   We burned through our food and snacks due to the extra effort going up. Now, we were on auto pilot.

As darkness approached, we broke out the headlamps and realized we would be hiking for at least another hour.  The forest and moonless night made for a slow descent as we picked our way over the obstacles.  My headlamp needed the batteries replaced, but I kept going.  I did have spare batteries, but just didn’t want to stop.  After a week of night hiking the 100 Mile Wilderness last year, this wasn’t too bad.  My hiking partners weren’t digging it though.  Actually, I was tired and ready for it to end too.

If you’ve hiked this trail, you know how hard it is to follow  – especially at night.  As Mary discovered, the scorpions come out at night here.   While I was struggling to see the trail ahead, she was seeing every crawling critter on the path.  Oh well, at least the scorpions are small.

After 1 1/2 hrs, we finally reached the parking area and were dog-tired.  We were still committed to the post-hike celebratory meal of In-N-Out with “animal style fries”.  Well, if you live out here – you know what that is.

This hike is a great workup for a Mt. Whitney type trip.  We used it as a warmup for the JMT.  Even though the trail humbled us, we came away confident with a few lessons learned.

1.  Take more water than you think you need or have the ability to filter some.  For me that’s 1 liter for every 3 miles.  Your mileage may vary.  I carry a backup 24 oz. Camelbak bottle and needed it on this hike.

2. Take extra food and snacks.  While we had enough, it wasn’t enough if we had gotten lost and needed to spend the night.  Keep some of those nuclear proof classic Clif Bars in your emergency pack.

3.  Hiking at night is slow going, especially in tough terrain.  Scree isn’t as obvious and a rolled ankle 3 miles from the trailhead is a bad thing.

We use trekking poles when hiking.  This is a good set that is reasonably priced:  Kelty Upslope 2.0 Trekking Poles, Ano Blue  Unless you are a pro, don’t spend your money on the carbon fiber poles.

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