Adventures in hiking…

Posts tagged “bear attack

Encounter with a Grizzly in Glacier National Park – Part 2

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This is the end of a two part story.  Part 1 can be found here:

https://thelatebloomerhiker.com/2014/11/14/encounter-with-a-grizzly-in-glacier-national-park-part-1/

 

We entered an area of bear grass and watched as the breeze caused the creamy white flowers to sway in unison.  Figuring that we had two miles to go, I was ready to hop on to the shuttle and enjoy a nice steak at the restaurant in the RV park where we were staying.  The Piegan Pass – Siyeh Pass Trail had been an amazing hike thus far.   I noticed several piles of huckleberry-laden scat on the trail and slowed to see if it was from a bear.  As I got closer, I noticed steam rising from it.  I froze and raised my arm to signal to my wife who was about thirty feet behind to stop.   Suddenly, there was a rustling to my right and two bear cubs jumped out running across the trail.  Within seconds an adult grizzly appeared and stopped in the middle of the trail, between us.  I spoke in a calm voice and said “hey bear”.  The mother grizzly reared up on her hind legs and let out a snarl that resonated through every bone in my body.  I fumbled for the bear spray in the holster on my hip.

I told my wife to back away and not run.  Time seemed to stand still as the massive bear lowered to all fours and stared me down.  I think that I kept talking to her in a calm voice to avoid an all out confrontation.  At this point, she was probably 20 feet away as I continued to back away.  She was looking at me and snorting while occasionally making glances toward her cubs off trail.  Due to the adrenaline rushing through my body, my ears started ringing.  I flipped the plastic safety off the bear spray and put my finger on the trigger.  Not wanting to provoke her, I backed away and kept talking.   The grizzly rocked back and forth on her haunches, growled took a couple of steps toward me.

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Grizzly mother with cubs. Photo: Britannica.com

 

My mind was racing as I thought about what to do in a grizzly attack.  I avoided eye contact as much as possible since they see this as a challenge.  If attacked with this species, it is best to curl up or lay on your stomach.  Protect the back of your neck and play dead.  It is usually not effective to fight back unless you are being mauled and death is certain.  In the midst of this I prayed a simple prayer – “Dear Lord, please get me out of this alive.  Amen”

I had to put more distance between myself and this mad momma, so I must have done a moon walk or something because she was now 40 feet away.  Suddenly she snorted and charged, closing half the distance in a few seconds.  I raised the bear spray,  squeezed the trigger and swept it back and forth for a few seconds.   It created a cloud of industrial strength capsaicin between me and the angry ursine.

Angry Grizzly Bear

Mad grizzly. Photo credit http://www.animalsw.com

The cloud of pepper spray floated in the air.  The sow sneezed and let out a roar.  I backed up another ten feet or so preparing to give her another dose.  Everything seemed to be in slow motion again.   She advanced toward me again before suddenly turning and trotting toward her cubs.  Standing there, I came to my senses and started yelling for my wife.  Not hearing anything, I made my way back up the trail, blowing my whistle.  I heard my wife’s whistle and saw her about 100 yards away, standing on a boulder.

We hugged and talked about how we would get back to the trailhead.  Not wanting to back track for ten miles, we proceeded down the same path making a lot of noise.  I even let out a blast of a portable air horn that I kept in my survival kit.  We emerged into a clearing and increased our pace.  Passing a series of cascades that feed Saint Mary Lake, the beauty of the surroundings escaped me.

The remaining mile seemed to take forever.  We passed through one last forest and heard some cars as they traversed the Going-to-the-Sun-Road.  It was surreal as we stepped out on the road and made our way to the shuttle.  Breathing a sigh of relief, we boarded the shuttle and made our way back to the visitor center.  I reported our encounter to the ranger.  He mentioned that this was the second report of a sow and cubs on the Siyeh Pass Trail this week.

Back at the RV park, we went to the restaurant where I had the biggest steak ever.  That night and for many more, I would relive the experience and would wake up in a cold sweat.

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This two-part blog was a work of fiction.  If you have read some of my other tall tales, you probably knew that.  I weave a story together using actual hikes that we’ve done with some creative story telling.   Grizzly attacks are a rare occurrence in the U.S.  Some quick research showed five fatal grizzly attacks on humans in the lower 48 since 2010.   There are probably less than 1,500 grizzlies south of Canada.  Alaska is home to over 30,000 grizzlies.  Sometimes they are confused with equally aggressive black bears.   Bear-spray is probably the most effective deterrent for a charging bear.  Research, experience and statistics show that firearms are less effective than pepper spray.  Understand the risks where you hike and camp.  Take proper precautions and avoid hiking solo in areas with grizzly or black bear activity.  This is a good resource for understanding bear behavior: http://www.bearsmart.com/becoming-bear-smart/play

Hike strong, and for heaven’s sake take out that headset!

Some gear that we use:

Rescue whistle:  Adventure Medical Kits Sol Rescue Howler Whistles (2) , 2 – Ounce

Bear repellent:  SABRE FRONTIERSMAN Bear Attack Deterrent with Hip Holster – Maximum Strength & 30 Foot Range (7.9 oz)

Survival blanket:  Adventure Medical Kits Sol Survival Blanket, Two Person, 3.2 Ounce

I use a Nikon 3000 series camera and have really been pleased with it.  It is easy to use and takes awesome pictures.  It’s durable and has survived many hiking and camping trips.  Nikon D3200 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-200mm Non-VR DX Zoom Lenses Bundle

 


Encounter with a Grizzly in Glacier National Park – Part 1

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……Within seconds an adult grizzly appeared and stopped in the middle of the trail, between us.  I spoke in a calm voice and said “hey bear”  The mother grizzly turned, reared up on her hind legs and let out a snarl that resonated through every bone in my body.  I fumbled for the bear spray in the holster on my hip.

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Our trip to Glacier National Park was on our bucket list for hiking destinations.   We were on the tail-end of a RV trip through Canada and looking forward to  Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks.  St Mary is a nice village outside the eastern entrance to Glacier.  The RV park was within walking distance of the national park visitor center so we struck out on foot.   It was a mostly cloudy day and the peaks in the distance were obscured by a cloud layer, but we were determined to get some hiking in.  The ranger in the visitor center recommended the Piegan-Siyeh Pass Trail to get the most bang for the buck in a day hike.  He mentioned awesome views and a steady 2,500-3,000 ft. climb.  It was late August, so there was still plenty of daylight for the eleven mile trek.

My wife was watching for the shuttle and motioned for me to come along.  Good thing too, because it was ready to pull out.   The shuttle system in GNP is efficient and covers a large area.  The Going-The-Sun-Road was undergoing repairs and the ride to the trail was slow.  As the shuttle traversed St Mary Lake, I hoped that the trail would not be totally in the clouds.  Our stop came up and we were the only ones that got off.  We found the Piegan Pass trailhead sign and took a few pics – of course.

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As you can see, the clouds enveloped the trail behind me.  We checked our gear, I had the bear spray and my wife the bear bell.  The bell was a last-minute purchase.  I found this joke.  Some background: The hiker was buying a bear bell and asked a store owner how to tell if he was in grizzly territory.  They were discussing bear scat (poop):

…Well, what’s the difference?” asks the hiker. “I mean, what’s different between grizzly scat and black bear scat?” “The stuff that’s in it,” replies the store owner. Getting a little frustrated, the hiker asks, “OK, so what’s in grizzly bear scat that isn’t in black bear scat?” he asks, an impatient tone in his voice. “Bear bells,” replies the old man as he hands the hiker his purchases

The effectiveness of the bell is debatable.  In bear country, it’s a good idea to make some noise while hiking.  We definitely made noise, occasional whooping, hitting our poles together and talking in our outside voices.  We did this so that we didn’t surprise a bear.  They don’t want human interaction so, they typically will avoid the noise.DSC_0487

Making our way through the forest, I occasionally made an “aahroooh” sound just to make some noise.  Funny thing, a hiker coming from the opposite direction said people behind him thought that they heard a moose bellowing.  There you go, I can make moose sounds.  Glad that it’s not mating season.

The weather changed to light snow, reminding us that in Glacier it is so unpredictable.  The wind picked up and we added another layer of clothing.  The trail came to a intersection with Piegan Pass going north west and Siyeh Pass to the east.  We went east and reached the summit where the clouds broke long enough to take some photos.  After a lunch break, the clouds closed in and visibility was 50 feet.  The switchbacks helped us descend fairly quickly, and I could see through a break in the clouds where the trail leveled out and entered a bushy area.

From a distance we could see the flowers of the bear grass.  They looked a little like the blooming flowers of the yucca plant that we have in California. DSC_0554

Next:  Hey bear!   Encounter with a Grizzly in Glacier National Park – Part 2

https://thelatebloomerhiker.com/2014/11/22/encounter-with-a-grizzly-in-glacier-national-park-part-2/

Gear that we use:

Bear deterrent:  SABRE FRONTIERSMAN Bear Attack Deterrent with Hip Holster – Maximum Strength & 30 Foot Range (7.9 oz)

Bear bell:  Bear Bell w/ Silencer

I use a Nikon 3000 series camera and have really been pleased with it.  It is easy to use and takes awesome pictures.  It’s durable and has survived many hiking and camping trips.  Nikon D3200 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-200mm Non-VR DX Zoom Lenses Bundle