Adventures in hiking…

Posts tagged “AMS

Kearsarge Pass – A Thru Hiker Highway

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Ask any Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) thru-hiker about Kearsarge Pass and they will confirm that it is a main resupply route.  We would run across more PCT and JMT hikers than ever before.  Generally, they are the most laid back people you will meet.

After a restless nights’ sleep near Pothole Lake, we decided to leave our camp set up and venture out west of the pass.  A nice breakfast of bacon and eggs got us going.  The crytallized eggs are real and when mixed with water, scramble up perfectly.  The pre-cooked bacon is trail ready and is good to go.  We lightened our packs and carried enough supplies for our day hike.  The plan was to drop down into the Kearsarge Lakes area and grab lunch next to the water.

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Our camp was within sight of the pass so the last 400 ft of elevation gain was easy-peasy.  There was one other hiker taking a break and we dropped our packs to soak in the vista.  The views to the west were beautiful.   In the Sierras, one will run out of words to describe the scenery.  There were several lakes below;  one I recognized from the map as Bullfrog Lake.  We wanted to explore down below so we ate a snack and chatted with a thru-hiker going back to town for resupply.  Like so many other long distance hikers we’ve seen, he looked like he was in need of a bath and some good food.  We started down, the slope steady with what appeared to be pulverized granite rocks for the trailbed.

We ran into a few day hikers huffing their way up and stepped out-of-the-way.  Trail etiquette being what it is, the uphill hiker has the right of way.  We ran across a lonely stream making its’ way down to the lakes.  The source of water appeared to come out the side of the mountain.  A bullfrog could be heard croaking steadily.  We never saw it, but heard that sucker for the next 30 minutes.  We made our way down some switchbacks to a trail junction.

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Wishing that we had more time to hike to Charlotte and Rae Lakes area, we hiked another 1/2 mile or so to the Kearsarge Lakes area.  The trail is fairly well-defined and meandered down to the first lake.  It was warmer now, around 75 degrees and other than a few people fishing on the other shore, very quiet.  The only other sound were the streams emptying into the lake.   We took off our shoes and stepped in to the cold, clear water.  After a minute, the bones in my legs started aching.  Well, probably not but that’s what it felt like.  It was brisk and felt good on our hot feet.  The trout were jumping every few seconds.  The Golden Trout Wilderness is aptly named.  We discussed getting our fishing licenses and gear before our next hike into this area.  I can taste the fresh trout cooked in a pan with just a touch of lemon and garlic.

 

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After eating our lunch and filtering some water, we reluctantly started back up the trail.  The climb out was less strenuous than it would have been with a full pack.  We ran into a PCT hiker who had lost the cap to his water filtration chemical bottle.  It was tiny and we struck up a conversation and he eventually found it.    As I was taking a breather on a bend in a switchback, another hiker was coming up behind.  I usually ask hikers where they are coming from or where they are going out of curiosity.  She was a PCT hiker, who had recently gotten back on the trail.   She passed me and struck up a conversation with my wife who  (as always) is ahead of me.  They immediately hit it off and continued talking as we slowly made our way up to the pass.  Conversation is a good diversion when you are in a steep climb.  Of course it helps if you’re not out of breath.

The women continued to chat and it was a nice experience to meet a thru-hiker who took the time to relate their experience on the trail.  PCT hikers run the gambit from those that are on a sabbatical to modern-day hippies.  Sometimes I believe that long distance hikers are a sub-culture within our Americana.  Her trail-name was Pillsbury,  and she was quite the character.  Before long, we reached the pass where we hung out with Pillsbury and the other PCT hiker who went my the moniker Dances with Bacon.  He was a nice guy and we chatted for a bit.  Heck, with a trail-name like that, he couldn’t be bad.

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Pillsbury  wanted to take some fun pics, so she climbed an outcropping and asked me to take some pics with her camera.  She got up her nerve and did some hand-stands.  The blustery wind was a bit much and I was glad when she finished.  She was heading into town to resupply and had another 4-5 miles to go.  While it’s mostly downhill from here, the town of Independence is about 13 miles from the trailhead in the Onion Valley Campground.  We enjoyed our time with Pillsbury and parted ways when we reached the part of the trail where our camp was located.

We had time to enjoy our camp this time.  It was nice at the site and we didn’t rush through dinner.  The Black Bart Chili tasted great.  It’s one of our favorites.    As we settled in for the night, the wind was not as strong so the water from the lake was not lapping the rocks as loud as the previous night.  Did I mention that the first night, the sound of the water was like footsteps? We were sure that someone (or some thing) was walking around our tent.   Freaked us out for a few minutes until I stuck my head out of the tent around 2 a.m. and discovered it was the sound of wind-driven water against the shore of the lake.

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No AMS symptoms tonight, we were fully acclimated.  Slept soundly and awoke to a crisp Sierra morning.  Not wanting to cook breakfast, we had some snacks and departed our hidden campsite on Pothole Lake.  We took a different route out and had to do some boulder scrambling.  Not sure that it was a wise choice.  A fall here would have hurt.

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Our walk down was fairly quick and the scenery nice.  The coolness of the air as we went in and out of the forest was refreshing.   The lakes that we had passed going up looked so different.  Still lots of jumping trout though.  We took a break near a cascading creek, the breeze and sound of rushing water enough for one to desire a nap.

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This hike was a good one for many reasons, but it turns out to be our best way in for our JMT section hike next year.   The JMT is a short trek from Kearsarge Pass.  Mt. Whitney, here we come.

Some lessons learned on this trip:

– We experienced mild Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) symptoms on our first night.  Our symptoms were headaches, nausea and a bad nights’ rest.  While we have camped around 10,000 ft. before, on this trip, we left San Diego in the morning from an altitude of 500 ft.  Ten hours later, we were at 11,400 ft.  Our bodies didn’t have a chance to acclimate.  Recommendation:  When hiking at high altitude, camp at a lower altitude on the first night to give your body a chance to adjust.

– Dehydrated foods take longer to cook at high altitude.  In our case, the normal 12-15 minutes of rehydration took almost 30 minutes.

– If given the opportunity, start a conversation with fellow hikers.  You will meet the most amazing people from all walks of life.  Many have funny, interesting stories from the trail.  You won’t find many creeps out here – they’re mostly back in the cities.

– Take the time to kick your shoes off and enjoy a dip in the water.  Next time, I’m up for a swim. 🙂

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Marion Mountain Trail to San Jacinto Summit. JMT, We are Ready.

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U.S.D.A. Identifier: Marion Mountain Trail-2E14

Type of trail: Out and back, composition: sand, decomposed granite, soft soil, rocks, pine straw

Distance as hiked: 12.5 miles

Approximate elevation: Trailhead-6,400ft., Top of trail-10,834ft.

Temps:75-90 degrees

Difficulty: strenuous

The last time we hiked Marion Mountain Trail was in April/May of 2012.  Snow covered a good portion of the trail above 8,000 ft, and we only made it to the junction.  It is known as one of the shortest and steepest routes to the summit of San Jacinto.

We took my brother on this hike as a warm up for the JMT at the end of the month.  this is a challenging trail with difficult terrain.  You must keep a sharp eye out for the path as it gets tricky.

Less than half a mile into today’s hike, I came within a foot of a Pacific rattler, who warned me in the nick of time.  My hiking pole was inches away from his tail.  I backed away slowly to allow this 4-5 foot adult make his way up the slope.  Close encounters with rattlers gets the adrenaline going.   The color and pattern of this one blended in perfectly with the trail.   While I’ve had over a dozen encounters with rattlers in my few years of hiking, this was the closest.  Our altitude was approx. 6,700 ft.  In my observation, snakes are rarely seen above 8,000 ft. in the San Bernardino Mountains.  It made me more cautious the rest of the day and I also took the time to brief my hiking partners on how we would handle a poisonous snake bite situation.

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Crossing paths with a 4-5 foot Pacific Rattler.

After snapping a few photos of this viper, we focused on our journey to the summit.  The trail wastes no time in elevation gain as it climbs out at over 900 ft. per mile.   The short switchbacks and rocky, sandy trail makes for a calf and quad burning extravaganza.

Due to the lack of snowfall last winter, the vernal streams are fewer and water flows much less.  The first significant stream was around 9,300-9,400 ft., and probably feeds into the tiny San Jacinto River.  The temps stayed in the 80’s for much of this trek and we were using up our water faster than predicted.  There were a couple of other streams where a someone with a pump could extract some water.

Sometimes, I question why we do these tough hikes.  Marion Mtn is one of the hardest ones around.  It’s really mind over matter because it isn’t always fun.  It does build confidence in the sense that once you put your mind to something,  you can conquer it.  Besides, if you always hiked on flat terrain it would be boring.

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We took many breaks today due to the heat and intensity of the trail.  We started feeling the possible symptoms of mild acute mountain sickness (AMS) around 9,000 ft.  To compensate, a motrin and increased fluid intake helped, as well as slowing the ascent.   Symptoms may include nausea, light-headedness and a mild headache.  We kept an eye on this and agreed to head back down if the symptoms did not go away.  AMS is nothing to play around with and is important to recognize it as it can lead to a more serious condition.  You can read about it here: http://www.altitude.org/altitude_sickness.php

We took a lunch break at the junction of the PCT/Marion Mtn/Seven Pines trails.  From the junction, you enter a heavily wooded area for 1/2 mile and begin a steady climb that is exposed to afternoon sun.  The trail is rocky with occasional shade under some conifers. We continued on to Little Round Valley campground.  It is a nice area with private campsites less than a mile to the summit.  The nearby vernal stream  was pretty much dry, so I recommend you top off at the stream about 700-800 yds before camp on the ascent.

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We broke out into a clearing with signs that pointed us to the summit and points to the tram, Wellman’s Divide, Deer Springs Trail and Humber Park.  The views to several 10,000+ peaks and the desert below are beautiful.

No hike to San Jacinto is complete without stopping by the summit cabin.  The last 200 ft. to the summit are spent scrambling up boulders and around the flora.  At the top, we saw several others – not too bad.  Sometimes, you can run in to 30 or 40 people crowded around the sign.  It was 5:30 by then, so that might have something to do with it.

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We started down by 6 p.m. knowing that it was going to be a close call on darkness.  I have to admit, this trail is no easier going down  since you have to pick your way around the rocks and scree.   We burned through our food and snacks due to the extra effort going up. Now, we were on auto pilot.

As darkness approached, we broke out the headlamps and realized we would be hiking for at least another hour.  The forest and moonless night made for a slow descent as we picked our way over the obstacles.  My headlamp needed the batteries replaced, but I kept going.  I did have spare batteries, but just didn’t want to stop.  After a week of night hiking the 100 Mile Wilderness last year, this wasn’t too bad.  My hiking partners weren’t digging it though.  Actually, I was tired and ready for it to end too.

If you’ve hiked this trail, you know how hard it is to follow  – especially at night.  As Mary discovered, the scorpions come out at night here.   While I was struggling to see the trail ahead, she was seeing every crawling critter on the path.  Oh well, at least the scorpions are small.

After 1 1/2 hrs, we finally reached the parking area and were dog-tired.  We were still committed to the post-hike celebratory meal of In-N-Out with “animal style fries”.  Well, if you live out here – you know what that is.

This hike is a great workup for a Mt. Whitney type trip.  We used it as a warmup for the JMT.  Even though the trail humbled us, we came away confident with a few lessons learned.

1.  Take more water than you think you need or have the ability to filter some.  For me that’s 1 liter for every 3 miles.  Your mileage may vary.  I carry a backup 24 oz. Camelbak bottle and needed it on this hike.

2. Take extra food and snacks.  While we had enough, it wasn’t enough if we had gotten lost and needed to spend the night.  Keep some of those nuclear proof classic Clif Bars in your emergency pack.

3.  Hiking at night is slow going, especially in tough terrain.  Scree isn’t as obvious and a rolled ankle 3 miles from the trailhead is a bad thing.

We use trekking poles when hiking.  This is a good set that is reasonably priced:  Kelty Upslope 2.0 Trekking Poles, Ano Blue  Unless you are a pro, don’t spend your money on the carbon fiber poles.

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