Adventures in hiking…

Camping

Where You Pitch Your Tent Matters

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Big Pothole Lake on the Kearsarge Pass Trail

It was a quiet night in the San Gorgonio Wilderness.  Saxton Camp filled up with a Boy Scout troop, so we retreated a few hundred feet downhill in relatively flat clearing .  Leary of camping near big groups, they actually were well-behaved and turned in at a respectable time.  Surrounded by conifers, our home for the evening was barely visible from the trail.  This would serve as our base camp for our hike up to the tallest peak in Southern California.  We stowed our bear canisters and hung our packs from nearby trees, unzipping the pockets so the little vermin didn’t chew through them.  Settling in for a decent sleep, I was awakened by a bright light shining into the side of the tent.  What the heck?  Thinking that someone was wandering around our site, I listened for the footsteps.  Nothing.  The light continued to shine, barely moving.  Maybe I left a flashlight in my pack and it came on.  A few minutes later, I gathered enough courage to unzip the door and peek out.   The fullness of the moon lit up our tent as it crested the mountain to our east.

Terrain matters when it comes to pitching your tent.  Setting it up in the wrong spot could be the difference between life and death.   That beautiful spot near the lake could be where the water drains during a downpour.

If you are on a multi-day trip on an established trail, chances are you have a trail guidebook or maybe you’ve read a blog that provided mile markers and campsites.  Those are valuable resources.  Prior to our section hike of the JMT last year, I picked up John Muir Trail: The essential guide to hiking America’s most famous trail.  It is an awesome resource.  I was able to set waypoints on my Garmin 401 and get fairly close.  Or you can live life on the edge, just hike until it’s dark and plop down near the trail.

Many locations in the national forest and parks require you to camp at least 100 ft. from the trail and 200 ft. from water sources. Most of us make half-hearted attempts at this rule.  I mean, the sound of rushing water makes for a great night of sleep.  Hikers are generally good stewards of the land and really try to minimize the impact.  You do this by camping on established sites and avoid vegetation like grass.  Rules vary in each area, so check online or with the local ranger if appropriate.  Camp too close to water and the mosquitoes will torment you.

Once, I was solo hiking in the eastern Sierras and started looking for a site.  I found a granite slab that was 25 ft. from a cliff that dropped off about 200 ft. into a lively creek.  The view was amazing, but then I thought about getting up in the middle of the night when nature called and stepping off into the abyss.  So,  rocks are not a good idea for a tent unless it is far away from drop-offs and you have a way to stake the tent down.  Rocks also are good lightning conductors!

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200 ft down to North Fork Creek. I almost camped here. No, really.

When looking for a site, envision what it would look like in a raging downpour.   Will the water funnel through your site like a drainage ditch?  Will that Fiat sized boulder up the hill come loose and roll over you like a bowling ball?  In the Sierras, those granite covered slopes shed water quickly during rain and can create flash flood conditions.

Widow-makers:  Those dead trees that are still standing.  Pitch your tent under those when a strong wind hits and you won’t know what hit you.   If you do pick a site under trees, make sure it’s not  under the tallest group of trees, nor the shortest.  Go for the medium stand, you will be less likely to get struck by lightning.

Common sense, but find a site that is relatively flat without roots or rocks.   A good sleeping pad helps knock the edge of those little rocks that feel like boulders at night.   If you must sleep on an incline, your head should be at the highest point.  Even the slightest hill may cause you to gravitate toward your tent-mate in the middle of the night. That may be good, or bad.  If you have to pitch your tent on a hill, have your door on the downhill side so water doesn’t come rushing in.

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Camping on the AT in Maine.

Some other tips:

Don’t cook or eat within 50-100 ft. of your tent.  Stow the bear canister or bag the same distance.  If not you may get some late night company looking for food.

Align your tent so the smallest surface area is facing the prevailing wind.  This isn’t always possible, especially if you have a square tent.  🙂    At a minimum, place your opening away from the wind to avoid the parachute effect.

For backcountry camping, shop around and spend the money on a quality tent.  The $20 one in the discount store will not hold up during a gusher.  Use a tent footprint.  It’s like a light weight tarp that fits under your tent.  It is slightly larger than the floor of your tent and will protect the floor from damage due to rocks and roots.  I know, if you are a thru-hiker, ounces count.

Invest in a good set of tent stakes.  Most low-end tents come with lousy stakes that bend easily.  There are a couple of brands like MSR GroundHog Stake Kit that are light weight and sturdy.  These are virtually indestructible.  I usually find a rock and bang them in.  I also carry extras in case they get damaged or if it’s really windy.  Carry some extra para-cord or nylon line in your tent bag in case you need to tie on some extra guy lines.

Klingers:  People who camp right next to you, even though there are other places to camp.  Don’t be a Klinger.

Lightning:  No tent can protect you from 150,000 volts, but it can keep you dry.  During bad thunderstorms, you can do the following:  If you believe in God, pray and minimize your body contact with the ground or sit on your pad, sleeping bag or backpack.  If you are an atheist or agnostic, just curl up in the fetal position, put your headset in, crank up the volume and close your eyes.

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Near a glacier fed stream and under some aspens. Works for me.

In the morning, the tent may be wet from dew or the overnight shower.  If you don’t have time to dry it out before hitting the trail,  use your camp towel to wipe it down.  If you are camping in Washington or Oregon, just resign yourself to the fact that it will never get dry.    Never stow a wet tent at the end of your trip.  It is guaranteed to ruin it with mold and mildew.  It’s a good idea to vacuum out a tent and wipe it down with a mild soap.  I treat mine along the seams with a waterproof sealant that I got here:  Gear Aid Tent Sure floor sealant with foam brush, 8-Ounce.

I like positioning the door of our tent for easy access if you have to get up during the night.  Hey, you’ll understand when you get old.  But the most important thing is a site with a view.  You will know it when you see it.

 

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Thousand Island Lake, John Muir Trail

Do you have some tips or lessons learned about setting up your tent?  Please share them in the comments!   Most importantly, don’t be a Klinger.


Trapped! Wildfire in Yosemite Part II

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Wildfire in Yosemite – Photo Credit – Michael Frye/AP

This is the second half of a two-part story.  Part I is here: https://thelatebloomerhiker.com/2014/10/03/wildfire-in-yosemite-part-i/

No time to panic here, first find out where we are at and then determine our options.  Getting the GPS and our map, we determined that we were about three or four miles east of Little Yosemite Valley and the Merced River.  It was hard to tell how far we were from the actual fire at this point, but knew that it was generally to our east around Babcock or Merced Lake.   Our options were limited because the other paths out were both uphill which would slow us down.  We just descended 800 ft. and there sure was a lot of timber fuel back there.  Our only real choice was to head west.

We picked up the pace  when the first chopper flew in front of us – about 1/2 mile or so.   It had a bucket hanging underneath.  Well, at least the calvary was arriving.   As we came across a saddle, we saw a horrifying sight.  The fire was crossing a canyon to our left and climbing the mountain.  Was it moving east or south?  It was hard to tell.   At this point, we kept going but discussed what we would do if we were boxed in by fire.   One option was to find rocky terrain  or a meadow with little or no fuel.   Another was to find a creek or body of water, but the nearest was the Merced River.

A few minutes later, another helicopter was circling less than a mile away.  We heard a loudspeaker but were unable to make out what they were saying.   Two more mule deer ran across the trail about fifty feet behind us.  They were heading in a northerly direction.  The helicopter was making concentric circles and came within 500 feet of us.  This time we clearly heard the loudspeaker as it blared: “There is a wildfire burning to the east and heading this direction.  Make your way to Little Yosemite Valley immediately!”

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Helicopter rescue on Half Dome, Sep 2014. Photo credit AP.

We were around 30-40 minutest from the rally point.  Would they evacuate us from there?   We kept pushing and noticed that smoke was starting to appear in front of us.    Up ahead there was a clearing with a person.  As we got closer it became apparent that it was two people.  One was laying down and the other was frantically waving at us.  It was a woman waving and a guy was laying down.  I asked what happened and she said they were running when he collapsed.  I checked for a pulse and breathing and found both.  He seemed to have passed out, but it was hard to tell if he had suffered a heart attack.  He started to come around and we propped his head up on the pack.  He was delirious and then I noticed that he wasn’t sweating.  I asked the woman if she had any water to give him and she told me they ran out about an hour ago.  At this point I guessed that he was suffering from heat exhaustion or heat stroke.  I gave him a small amount of water and moved him into the shade of a big lodgepole pine.

I told my wife and brother to continue on to Little Yosemite Valley and that I would stay behind with these two.  I gave them our GPS coordinates to pass to the rescue personnel.    I also activated my SPOT GPS locator.  I told the woman to gradually give her friend some water and I would attempt to signal the helicopter.   It was still making circles making announcements but did not see us.  Getting my signal mirror out, I started aiming at the chopper.  One, two-three times.  Wait…..one, two-three.  After 10-15 minutes the pilot turned in our direction and descended.   I immediately laid down on my back with my hands extending out – the international signal for distress-“need medical attention”    The clearing was large enough for them to land.  A rescue crewman jumped out and checked out the downed hiker.   We helped carry him to the helicopter in a stretcher and there was enough room for all of us.

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Half Dome from the “other side”.

Lifting off, I had a brief flashback from my time as a naval aircrewman going through survival training.   Only this time, I was the one being rescued.  Flying by Half Dome,  you could see a crowd of people waiting to be rescued.  We landed in a staging area near the Ahwahnee Hotel where the hiker was taken by ambulance to the medical center.  We would later find out that he suffered from heat stroke but would recover.  Now, concerned for my family, I tried to find out what they were doing to evacuate the people in Little Yosemite Valley.   Within minutes, another helicopter landed and four people emerged.  I asked one of them where they came from.  They said that they were picked up in Little Yosemite Valley and that there were over 50 people left.  I prayed again for my family’s safety and another chopper landed with four more people.  You could see the smoke plumes from behind Half Dome as they went straight up to about 9-10,000 ft. and then blew in a westerly direction.

The landing zone for the helicopters was cordoned off by the park rangers, so I dropped my pack and waited as close as possible to the boundary.  Several more landed and finally by wife and brother emerged.   Hugging them both,  the first thing out of my brothers’ mouth was “Where can we get a hamburger?”  Yep, that’s how it ends.

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While this story was fiction, a wildfire caused by lightning did occur in Yosemite National Park east of Half Dome in September 2014.   The “Meadow Fire” consumed almost 5,000 acres and took several weeks to contain.  Over 100 hikers were evacuated from Half Dome and the area around Little Yosemite Valley.   The National Park Service led an orderly evacuation.  Fire is one of many hazards that one can encounter in the backcountry.  Always let someone know where you will be hiking and discuss events like flash floods, lightning and fire.

 


Kearsarge Pass – A Thru Hiker Highway

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Ask any Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) thru-hiker about Kearsarge Pass and they will confirm that it is a main resupply route.  We would run across more PCT and JMT hikers than ever before.  Generally, they are the most laid back people you will meet.

After a restless nights’ sleep near Pothole Lake, we decided to leave our camp set up and venture out west of the pass.  A nice breakfast of bacon and eggs got us going.  The crytallized eggs are real and when mixed with water, scramble up perfectly.  The pre-cooked bacon is trail ready and is good to go.  We lightened our packs and carried enough supplies for our day hike.  The plan was to drop down into the Kearsarge Lakes area and grab lunch next to the water.

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Our camp was within sight of the pass so the last 400 ft of elevation gain was easy-peasy.  There was one other hiker taking a break and we dropped our packs to soak in the vista.  The views to the west were beautiful.   In the Sierras, one will run out of words to describe the scenery.  There were several lakes below;  one I recognized from the map as Bullfrog Lake.  We wanted to explore down below so we ate a snack and chatted with a thru-hiker going back to town for resupply.  Like so many other long distance hikers we’ve seen, he looked like he was in need of a bath and some good food.  We started down, the slope steady with what appeared to be pulverized granite rocks for the trailbed.

We ran into a few day hikers huffing their way up and stepped out-of-the-way.  Trail etiquette being what it is, the uphill hiker has the right of way.  We ran across a lonely stream making its’ way down to the lakes.  The source of water appeared to come out the side of the mountain.  A bullfrog could be heard croaking steadily.  We never saw it, but heard that sucker for the next 30 minutes.  We made our way down some switchbacks to a trail junction.

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Wishing that we had more time to hike to Charlotte and Rae Lakes area, we hiked another 1/2 mile or so to the Kearsarge Lakes area.  The trail is fairly well-defined and meandered down to the first lake.  It was warmer now, around 75 degrees and other than a few people fishing on the other shore, very quiet.  The only other sound were the streams emptying into the lake.   We took off our shoes and stepped in to the cold, clear water.  After a minute, the bones in my legs started aching.  Well, probably not but that’s what it felt like.  It was brisk and felt good on our hot feet.  The trout were jumping every few seconds.  The Golden Trout Wilderness is aptly named.  We discussed getting our fishing licenses and gear before our next hike into this area.  I can taste the fresh trout cooked in a pan with just a touch of lemon and garlic.

 

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After eating our lunch and filtering some water, we reluctantly started back up the trail.  The climb out was less strenuous than it would have been with a full pack.  We ran into a PCT hiker who had lost the cap to his water filtration chemical bottle.  It was tiny and we struck up a conversation and he eventually found it.    As I was taking a breather on a bend in a switchback, another hiker was coming up behind.  I usually ask hikers where they are coming from or where they are going out of curiosity.  She was a PCT hiker, who had recently gotten back on the trail.   She passed me and struck up a conversation with my wife who  (as always) is ahead of me.  They immediately hit it off and continued talking as we slowly made our way up to the pass.  Conversation is a good diversion when you are in a steep climb.  Of course it helps if you’re not out of breath.

The women continued to chat and it was a nice experience to meet a thru-hiker who took the time to relate their experience on the trail.  PCT hikers run the gambit from those that are on a sabbatical to modern-day hippies.  Sometimes I believe that long distance hikers are a sub-culture within our Americana.  Her trail-name was Pillsbury,  and she was quite the character.  Before long, we reached the pass where we hung out with Pillsbury and the other PCT hiker who went my the moniker Dances with Bacon.  He was a nice guy and we chatted for a bit.  Heck, with a trail-name like that, he couldn’t be bad.

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Pillsbury  wanted to take some fun pics, so she climbed an outcropping and asked me to take some pics with her camera.  She got up her nerve and did some hand-stands.  The blustery wind was a bit much and I was glad when she finished.  She was heading into town to resupply and had another 4-5 miles to go.  While it’s mostly downhill from here, the town of Independence is about 13 miles from the trailhead in the Onion Valley Campground.  We enjoyed our time with Pillsbury and parted ways when we reached the part of the trail where our camp was located.

We had time to enjoy our camp this time.  It was nice at the site and we didn’t rush through dinner.  The Black Bart Chili tasted great.  It’s one of our favorites.    As we settled in for the night, the wind was not as strong so the water from the lake was not lapping the rocks as loud as the previous night.  Did I mention that the first night, the sound of the water was like footsteps? We were sure that someone (or some thing) was walking around our tent.   Freaked us out for a few minutes until I stuck my head out of the tent around 2 a.m. and discovered it was the sound of wind-driven water against the shore of the lake.

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No AMS symptoms tonight, we were fully acclimated.  Slept soundly and awoke to a crisp Sierra morning.  Not wanting to cook breakfast, we had some snacks and departed our hidden campsite on Pothole Lake.  We took a different route out and had to do some boulder scrambling.  Not sure that it was a wise choice.  A fall here would have hurt.

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Our walk down was fairly quick and the scenery nice.  The coolness of the air as we went in and out of the forest was refreshing.   The lakes that we had passed going up looked so different.  Still lots of jumping trout though.  We took a break near a cascading creek, the breeze and sound of rushing water enough for one to desire a nap.

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This hike was a good one for many reasons, but it turns out to be our best way in for our JMT section hike next year.   The JMT is a short trek from Kearsarge Pass.  Mt. Whitney, here we come.

Some lessons learned on this trip:

– We experienced mild Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) symptoms on our first night.  Our symptoms were headaches, nausea and a bad nights’ rest.  While we have camped around 10,000 ft. before, on this trip, we left San Diego in the morning from an altitude of 500 ft.  Ten hours later, we were at 11,400 ft.  Our bodies didn’t have a chance to acclimate.  Recommendation:  When hiking at high altitude, camp at a lower altitude on the first night to give your body a chance to adjust.

– Dehydrated foods take longer to cook at high altitude.  In our case, the normal 12-15 minutes of rehydration took almost 30 minutes.

– If given the opportunity, start a conversation with fellow hikers.  You will meet the most amazing people from all walks of life.  Many have funny, interesting stories from the trail.  You won’t find many creeps out here – they’re mostly back in the cities.

– Take the time to kick your shoes off and enjoy a dip in the water.  Next time, I’m up for a swim. 🙂

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Kearsarge Pass – Mind Over Matter

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Big Pothole Lake, Kearsarge Pass

 

Ask any hiker that ventures into the backcountry what the hardest part of the experience is and many will say “the mental part.”   Up until we logged hundreds of miles on the trail, I’m not sure if this would have made any sense.   Our recent journey off the path reiterated the mental part.  The fun began after we arrived at the Onion Valley Campground parking lot, fifteen miles or so from the tiny town of Independence.

The drive up from the town is an experience.  The road starts with a gradual climb out of the valley and the 180 degree switchbacks made it an exciting ride in our old BMW.   We saw mule deer along the way.  Be careful of the occasional rock in the road, especially at night.  The campground isn’t much in itself.  It’s pretty much a tent-only camp tucked away in the small valley where summertime temps creep into the 80’s.  At over 9,100 ft.   Independence Creek flows nearby.  We would park in the hiker’s lot and noticed a few hikers finishing their trek.  It was mid-late afternoon and some were looking for rides into Independence or Bishop.

The parking lot has a double vault toilet and cool creek water through a spigot.  In the summer, there is always someone coming or going here.  We started up the path sans hiking poles and my wife found a nice wooden hiking stick that another kind soul left near the trail-head.

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Little Pothole Lake

 

The Kearsarge Pass trail is a steady climb, averaging approximately 600-700 ft. per mile.  Well maintained, it gets a lot of traffic during the summer.  About half are day-hikers and those fishing.  The mild winter was kind to the trail and it was in good shape.  Since this was a 3 day hike, we packed extra food and enough clothing to change out.  Our packs were light compared to our previous JMT hike, but I might as well have been carrying a couch on my back-that’s how it felt after a couple of miles.

For me, hiking is one of those activities that demands everything you’ve got.  Unless you are a thru hiker or able to do this every week, it pushes you.  That’s part of the reason we do this – it is a mental and physical challenge.  Do this, and you can handle anything life throws at you.  My takeaway is “mind over matter”.

This hike starts out with typical scrub and manzanita.  Expect a warm one in the summer unless you start early.  Around 1.5 miles, you’ll pass next to a nice cascade fed from the lakes above.  Within another mile, we passed a couple of lakes, teeming with trout.  Experienced our first mosquitoes around 10,000 ft., but not too bad.

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The terrain gradually changes into a sub-alpine with a mix of pine and deciduous trees.   There is ample shade as you pass the 2-3 mile mark and the climb gets a bit harder with stepping-stones that test your endurance.  The wind picked up and it started to feel cool.  As long as we kept moving, it was ok.  Stop too long and it got cold.

We pushed through and around 6:30, began looking for a campsite.  The trail map showed a couple of more lakes within two hundred yards of the trail.  Nice, or so I thought.  The first one – Heart Lake was a disappointing 5-600 ft. descent so we passed it up.   My goal is to almost always camp near a water source.   Only one more lake on the map before the “summit” so this was it.  I took a GPS reading and compared it to my Tom Harrison map.  I confirmed there was a lake below when I asked a passing hiker.  He was young and had his earphones in so, I asked a couple of times – “Hey is there a lake down there?”  He nodded yes, so we began to look for a way in.

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Looking down on Big Pothole Lake.

It was after 7 p.m, and getting colder so we began our way down crossing through a talus field of assorted boulders.  About two hundred feet in, I spotted a primo campsite.  Flat, sandy and large enough for our little Eureka tent.  We settled in quickly and had dinner going within 20 minutes.  At 11,400 ft.,  the air chilled as the sun settled behind Kearsarge Pass.  I scrambled 200-300 ft. down the slopes of Big Pothole Lake to filter some much-needed water.  Six liters later, I slowly climbed back to camp.  Much of this water was for our base camp. We try to “tank-up” before hitting the trail because water is so heavy.

There was a strange phenomenon up here.  Moths, thousands of them inhabited the little pines.  At dusk, there were bats.  They would swoop in, emitting their sonar like squeaks.  It was quite the feast for them.  Never knew there were bats this high.

It was a chilly night, windy with temps in the 40’s.   Not bad, but the wind chill made it seem cooler.  This close to the pass, a stiff breeze was inevitable.  We snuggled into our sleeping bags, each of us with persistent headaches.  The thought of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) was at the front of my mind.  We were camping at the highest we’ve camped yet.  A couple of motrin helped to knock the edge off.  If the headaches persisted or other symptoms like nausea and dizziness occurred, we would have to descend.  Neither of us slept well.

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Sunset. Our talus backyard in the foreground of the eastern sky.

 

Next:  Pillsbury Does a Handstand at Kearsarge Pass.

 


Kearsarge Pass – Trip Planning

Matlock Lake, Kearsarge Pass Trail

 

When I asked my wife of 32 years what she wanted to do for our anniversary, she said “a backcountry trip.”  Men,  I know many wives will want to be pampered on this special day, and rightfully so.  Rare is the woman who will endure a trip into the wilderness to endure calf burning,  boulder scrambling, fending off mosquitoes and chilly nights to celebrate a wedding anniversary with her husband.

Even with a 3 day trip, there is a lot of preparation.  I pulled out the gear and checked  everything out.   The cats love it when I set up the tent in the living room.  Five tough miles from your car is not the time to find out your water filter pump doesn’t work.  Checklists are always great, but as you will see – not foolproof.

The eastern Sierras offer miles and miles of trails, most with ample supplies of water – even in the terrible drought that California is going through.  I’ve heard of Onion Valley, one of the more popular entry/exit routes by PCT thru-hikers.  Many will go through Kearsarge Pass to the Onion Valley Campground and hitch a ride into the little town of Independence to pick up a resupply, or catch a ride into Bishop.

The drive from San Diego County is around 4-5 hours through the pain-in-the-butt Riverside/San Bernardino area.  Mostly a pain because of the weird road patterns and traffic congestion.  Going up, we missed the Hwy 395 turnoff and kept going to take Hwy 58-E to Bakersfield.  It was actually better; while longer in mileage, we missed the 395 construction and endless traffic lights in/around Victorville.

Eastern Sierra Visitor Center

Eastern Sierra Interagency Visitor Center

Oh, before I forget I’ve learned some tips on getting permits for your trail of choice.  Many trails in the California wilderness require backcountry permits issued by the state or feds who manage the areas.  After researching the general area you want to hike, you can go to www.recreation.gov and register for an account.  Most decent trails have a quota system for overnight stays to minimize the environmental impact.  Typically, the recreation.gov website will issue 60% of the permits online, the other 40% for walk-ins at one of many locations-depending on where you want to enter.  Here’s the rub:  If you reserve online, there is a $5 per person and $6 processing fee.  If you do a walk-in it is free.  Reserve early, the popular trails fill up quickly.  I actually wanted to reserve Kearsarge Pass, but all the permits were issued so I applied for a nearby trail – Golden Trout.  Once I paid the $16 fee, I confirmed the day prior and locked in the reservation.  On the day of our arrival, I checked in at the Eastern Sierra Interagency Visitor Center and asked if I could obtain a walk-in for Kearsarge Pass.  Sure enough, there were permits available and the Forest Service ranger changed our permit-free of charge.

Looking down at Independence, Ca. through a talus field.

So, if you want to lock in a trail permit, do it online for a fee.  Otherwise, if your plans are flexible, pick out a few trails ahead of time and do a walk-in.  The visitor center in Lone Pine handles most of the permits for the Hwy 395 corridor.  It is the busiest on Fridays during the summer.    Arrive early to get your trail of choice.  It’s a nice facility with tons of information and a nice touristy shop.  They have decent trail maps, so stock up!

A little more on trip planning.  Be prepared for a variety of weather when camping.  In our 5th year of hiking, we’ve experienced snow in June.  The puffy jacket, knit cap and gloves are worth the extra pack weight.  Rain gear is good and will ward off hypothermia while hiking in the wilderness.  Bear canisters are often mandatory in much of the Sierras.  Sure, you can still hit the trail without one, but I’ve talked to many who have had their campsite visited by the wandering Yogi.   You can try hanging your food bag from a tree, but it’s known that mother ursines teach their young how to knock down the yummy treats at an early age.  Besides, the trees above 10,000 feet are pretty short.

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Kearsarge Pass

So, preparation and some common sense backcountry lessons learned are key to an enjoyable trip.  Oh, even using a checklist the hiking poles were hanging in the garage where I left them.  My knees hate me.

Next: Kearsarge Pass – Mind Over Matter

 

 

 


What Equipment Do I Need to Hike?

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You don’t need a pack mule for a day hike

After logging a few miles day hiking on various trails, we have come to understand why some people get into trouble while hiking.  From wearing flip-flops on rocky trails to not having any water on a hot hike,  many people think trails are a walk in the park.  I wonder how many people who went out on a day hike ended up spending the night in the wilderness?

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If you venture out more than a few miles on a day hike, it doesn’t hurt to bring along some “necessities”.

Here’s our short list:

  • Daypack
  • Hydration bladder or bottle
  • A good pair of hiking shoes or boots
  • Sock liners and merino wool socks
  • Synthetic shirts and pants.  Anything but 100% cotton
  • A hat with a brim
  • Sunglasses
  • The Ten Essentials (listed below)

The Ten Essentials-A list created in the 1930s by The Mountaineers:

  1. Map
  2. Compass
  3. Sunglasses and sunscreen
  4. Extra clothing
  5. Headlamp/flashlight
  6. First-aid supplies
  7. Firestarter
  8. Matches
  9. Knife
  10. Extra food

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Good to have:

  • hiking poles
  • GPS
  • large trashbag – makes good raincoat
  • neckerchief-synthetic
  • portable water filter or water purifier tablets
  • toilet paper, antiseptic wipes.  You never know.
  • duct tape
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Keep going higher…

Generally on day hikes, we take more than we need.  More water, more snacks and a portable stove to brew that cup of celebratory tea at the summit.   For those extended backcountry trips, every ounce counts so we use a checklist and carry only what we need with a few backup items like lighters, batteries and spare socks.  Some gear buying tips-spend the money on shoes and a good pack.  Research the gear on the web and read the reviews.

This is a nice GPS locator that I use: SPOT 2 Satellite GPS Messenger –

Bottom line, start with the ten essentials, you can’t go wrong.    


Big Pine Creek North Fork – Palisade Glacier – This Place Has It All

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Days 2-3 on the Big Pine Creek North Fork Trail…

Waking up the next morning, I noticed the condensation on the tent.  The rainfall last night raised the humidity a bit and these single wall tents can build up moisture if not ventilated.  I had closed the side flaps to keep the rain from bouncing into the tent.

As I went to the creek to filter some water, it was noticeable that the color was slightly turquoise and a bit cloudy.  Earlier this year I replaced my sturdy 2-bag Sawyer filter and picked up a Katadyn model.  We used it on the JMT and it is fast and effective.  Later, I would find out why the water was this color.

After breakfast, I tried to dry the tent out by wiping it down but ended up packing it up wet.  The forecast was for cooler temps and a lower chance of thunderstorms.   Breaking camp, I noticed several hikers had already passed.  Many of the day hikers stay in the campgrounds below and hit the trail early.  Labor Day weekend would prove to be a busy time in this area.

The aspens and Jeffrey Pines gave way to firs and lodgepole pines mostly clustered near the north fork of Big Pine Creek.  The creek has magnificent cascades and areas of slower, lazy currents as the terrain flattens out.  Fishing looks good down there.

The trail enters an area where the vegetation comes up to the edge of the trail and you cross several brooks and streams that drain into the creek.  I imagine that in late spring, early summer the water is fairly high through here.  I took a break about 10 ft. off the trail and about fifteen day hikers passed by.  Not that I was hiding, but none of them ever saw me.  I’ve finally learned how to become one with the environment.   Also learned that when hikers are exerting  themselves,  they can only see about three feet-straight ahead.

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Around the three-mile mark, I reached a junction by a stream.  The trail to the left was more popular and provided a more gradual climb.  I watched a small pack-train and eight horseback riders take that trail.  Most others were going that way too. I chose the path to Black Lake and began an immediate climb on an exposed slope, but was rewarded with some neat views of the turquoise glacier fed lakes below.

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Black Lake

Passing 9,000 ft the chaparral gave way to conifers and the slope levels out as it approaches Black Lake.  Appropriately named, the water was darker than the glacier fed lakes below.  This area isn’t as popular as lakes 1-5, so if you are seeking solitude, it’s a great location.   Finding a flat area for a tent far enough from the trail is a bit of a challenge, but I noticed several spots.  I pressed on to 5th Lake for a late lunch.

I climbed a large granite rock and was rewarded with clouds passing nearby.  Around 10,000 ft., the air was crisp and noticeably cooler.  The trail passes by a small 6th Lake, as you make your way through tall grasses near the shore.

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Eventually, I arrived at a junction.  Bear right and you can go to 5th Lake, a popular lunch gathering for the day hikers.  I found a nice sunny spot on an outcropping where I watched the anglers pull in rainbow trout.  After a while, I felt like a lizard sunning itself on the rocks.

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Fifth Lake

I met some people from the San Diego chapter of the Sierra Club.   They were probably in their 70’s and slowly made their way down the trail.   It’s usually humbling for me to meet older people in the backcountry, especially when the trail is tough.

Making my way down, I came up on a junction where some people were taking a break.  For some reason, I took a right and within 15 minutes knew that it was the wrong way.  I was heading up to the glacier.  While this would be a nice day hike, my full pack convinced me to turn around.  This time, when I reached the junction, I noticed the trail sign indicating the Glacier Trail.

The trail starts dropping quickly with multiple short switchbacks.  Much of the trail is exposed and it was warm.  Descending, the turquoise lake came into view.  The bank is steep but there are paths to the water.  Most of the day hikers come here in the summer to take a dip in the milky-blue-green water.

I started looking for a campsite near the lake and/or creek but the trail for the most part is a hundred feet above the shore.   Most of the choice campsites were taken so I trudged on.  Almost picked a spot on top of a flat granite boulder, but the sheer drop into the creek convinced me otherwise.  Yeah, I imagined getting up in the middle of the night when nature called…..

I ended up near the stream where the pack-train came through and filtered some water.  A couple of ladies came by and one, with a Swedish accent said that she had been drinking unfiltered stream water for many years.  She dunked her Nalgene in there and took a big swig.    I went upstream a bit since I watched the mules pee in the same stream the day before.  I’ll stick with the filtered  water thank you.   The Swedish woman told me the reason for the turquoise color in the lake was glacial ice.   She was partially correct, the glacier creates the color as it grinds its’ way over the rock and makes the silty, glacial milk.  During early spring, the melting snow dilutes the water and the color is not as distinct.

I backtracked and found a fairly flat area that appeared to be a vernal pond.  Unpacking the wet tent, I placed it in the sun and opened it up to dry it out.

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I almost camped on this ledge. Prudence won out.

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Last campsite. It rained for the second straight night.

I would later see a picture of my last campsite under water.  Seems that it is a vernal pond during the spring melt.

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The same campsite during the spring. Photo credit: http://www.chayacitra.com/

Making camp early gave me plenty of time to get some housekeeping done and explore the area.  The chipmunks were having a field day in the surrounding trees.  Kerplunk, kerplunk! as the green pine cones hit the ground.  Their incessant chattering made me want to throw rocks at them but I resisted.  After all, this is their neighborhood.

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Sunrise from the camp.

Sunset is amazing up here as the shadows on the craggy peaks provide a different perspective.  The breeze picked up and I closed the flaps on the tent.  Just after sunset, it started raining and I drug my belongings into the foyer of the tent.  It was a steady rain.  The distant waterfalls on Second Lake and the rain pushed me into an early sleep.

Dawn brought a nice Sierra sunrise, partially obscured by clouds and the surrounding peaks.  I was on the trail before long, only 5 miles from the trailhead.  The walk down was peaceful, coming across two fishermen and an early morning pack-train.  This area has it all – moderate hiking,  water, fishing, and enough scenery to satisfy the most avid photographer.  I highly recommend this trail – just don’t do it on holiday weekends.

Check out my new blog at:  http://mycaliforniadreamin.wordpress.com/

I use a Nikon 3000 series camera and have really been pleased with it.  It is easy to use and takes awesome pictures.  It’s durable and has survived many hiking and camping trips.  Nikon D3200 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-200mm Non-VR DX Zoom Lenses Bundle


How I Convinced My Wife to do Backcountry Hiking

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The title should really have peaked your interest.  How does a husband convince their wife to do anything? As we say in the military – here’s the Bottom Line Up Front (BLUF):  It takes time.

Most things worthwhile take some effort.  Typical of our manly ways, we tend to go for the gusto – straight away.  Backcountry, or multi-day hikes take a bit of planning especially for someone who has never been.  Specifically on the backcountry hiking,  it’s easier when you live in an area that is conducive to camping and hiking.  Either that or you have enough time and money to vacation in beautiful wilderness areas.

Living in southern California, we are within a days’ drive of the High Sierras which has made it uber-easy to do this outdoor activity.  However, every state in the union has locations for hiking.  From the Appalachian to the Continental Divide to the Pacific Crest Trails, including the national and state forests – there are many areas where you can get off the beaten path. Imagine Denali in amazing Alaska, or Waimea State Park on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.

For me, I was determined to do an outdoor activity with my wife that we could enjoy together.  We started by day hiking.  I bought a book on trails within San Diego County and we began going out on Saturdays.   We would pack a lunch and make a day of it.  The more secluded, the better.  Eventually, the hikes got longer with more elevation change.  While flat terrain is a good break, the challenge of a good cardio workout made it more than a walk in the woods.

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We would mix up mountain hiking with desert treks as the seasons allowed.  We developed a love of the outdoors and an appreciation for the creation.  As believers, we observed God’s handiwork in the land and His animals.   We also enjoyed each others’ company as we took breaks and drove to/from our hikes.   The time in the car is a great time to talk about your marriage – and life.  

You really don’t have to be equals as far as physical conditioning.  In our case, she kicks my butt on the trail.  However, consider the physical condition of your spouse.  Start out with easy, short hikes and make a date out of it.  It helps to start out with a trek that has awesome scenery.   End with a sunset and/or dinner at a new café. We’ve discovered some decent eateries while out on the road.  We also established a tradition of celebrating with a cup of hot tea after reaching each summit.   

There were times when I pushed us too hard or it was too hot, but we learned from our mistakes.  Once, we were almost swept into a lagoon in a rushing tidal inlet.  We often share that story with others and always laugh.  Another time, we got off track on a snow-covered mountain in the Sierras and bushwhacked for a couple of hours.  Every year, there are new stories to share.

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Day hiking presented an opportunity to do some camping.  We eventually combined car camping with some hikes.   If your spouse hasn’t camped before, car camping is a great intro.  It allows for conveniences like coolers, chairs and bathrooms.  If your kids are grown, go to campgrounds when school is in session.  Much less crowded…. 

During this time, we also visited epic locations like Yosemite.    Some places just leave you yearning for more.  The Sierras are this way.  I imagine the Rockies and so many other areas are similar.  Eventually, we did a 3 day backcountry trip to the highest peak in our area – San Gorgonio.  It was difficult, but rewarding. It really proved that she could hike in the backcountry with a full pack and sleep in the wilderness.  We still laugh about being awakened at midnight by the spotlight of a San Bernardino County Sheriff’s helicopter looking for a lost hiker.  Wilderness hiking builds memories.

I won’t exaggerate, it took a few years to get my wife into the backcountry on an extended trip.  We worked up to it.  I made sure that her needs were taken care of and that she felt safe.  I gradually built up trust and gained some knowledge on our wilderness treks.  Over the years, We’ve been lost a few times, but a handy GPS and some map skills would get us back on track.

I really could have made this blog a lot shorter by stating that backcountry hiking with your spouse (or significant other) isn’t going to happen quickly.  Start out with day hikes, progress to car camping and do a short backcountry trip that has awesome scenery.  “Now you’re cooking with peanut oil”  Phil Robertson-Duck Dynasty, A&E.

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Big Pine Creek North Fork – Palisade Glacier – Day 1

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2nd Lake, Big Pine Creek – North Fork

Tucked away on a mountain road near the eastern Sierra town of Big Pine is the entrance to one of the most amazing getaways.  The Big Pine Creek collection of campgrounds, lakes and trails are magnificent.

This trip was a last-minute adventure.  My wife was back east helping out with a new grandchild and I knew that I didn’t want to sit around over the long Labor Day weekend.  The Sierras are only 4-5 hours away from San Diego, so I packed up my gear and headed toward the Eastern Sierra Visitor Center in Lone Pine to get my backcountry permit.  I researched a few areas to hike and was prepared to “settle” for whatever was available.  Normally, this holiday weekend is one of the busiest up here.  You should especially avoid Yosemite Valley and Tuolumne unless your plans are very flexible.  One could write a blog on the best ways to get backcountry permits.  The trails in the various areas are under the jurisdiction of the USFS or National Parks and traffic is controlled through the use of permits.  About 40% of permits are reserved for walk-ins, the rest can be reserved through recreation.gov for a small fee.

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The visitor center was actually not that busy and I was able to easily obtain the permit for the Pine Creek North Fork trail.  Another 40 minutes and I was in Big Pine.  The sign on the road that takes you to the trail is fairly obscure and starts out as Crocker Rd.  The road passes through a neighborhood and gradually climbs several thousand feet.  The rocky, desert landscape starts to change as you approach the sub-alpine area where the campgrounds are.  The aspen and Jeffrey Pines are abundant in the lower elevations and I imagine that this is even more beautiful as the deciduous trees change in the fall.

The overnight parking lot for the hikers comes up on the right.  There is plenty of room, but I found out that the trailhead is almost a mile away.  Oh well, I needed to loosen up a bit.  I passed the pack-train corral and noticed signs for the various campgrounds and Glacier Lodge.  It was fairly busy in the camps as people were getting in their last bit of summer vacation.  The trailhead is well marked at the end of the road.  There is limited day use parking at the end and I recommend to drop off your gear if there are two or more hikers.

The trail wastes no time in elevation change as the steep, short switchbacks get the heart beating.  You cross the first footbridge and the creek is rapidly descending through cascades and waterfalls.  Normally, this time of year many of the creeks in the Sierras are dry.  Not here, the Palisade Glacier ensures a year-round flow.  The trail meanders through the forest but stays close to the creek.  The rushing water provides the assurance that you can follow it all the way up to its’ source.

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View from Black Lake trail

After the second footbridge, the trail gradually climbs the canyon and then flattens out for a bit.  The riparian environment changes to a desert landscape with some cactus hiding under the chaparral.  The trail diverges from the creek, but never far enough to lose sight or sound.  Occasionally, the sound of the cascading water is an indicator that you will be climbing again.  The louder the water, the steeper the incline.  I’m a simple guy, so I tend to associate simple things you know.

One of the things I love about hiking in the Sierras is the change in eco-systems as you ascend the trails.  You can start out in an arid desert and pass through riparian areas to sub-alpine forests with deciduous trees, followed by alpine forests and end up in snow-covered peaks above the tree line.  It’s so cool to see the flora change while you hike.  This trail appears to dead-end in a canyon and one knows there is only one way out – and that is up.  The path diverges from the creek and the long switchbacks quickly take you above 8,500 ft. Evidence of the pack trains litters the trail where their path emerges from the corral.  Fortunately, the trail is wide enough to step around the mule doodles.  The trail is well maintained with many man-made steps carved from the granite.  You round the corner near a significant cascade and the view is impressive.  Temple Crag comes into sight and the trail rises above the creek.  During the afternoon, the wildlife was missing but imagine that this is a place where deer would hang out.

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Big Pine Creek – North Fork – First Fall

Due to my late start and occasional thunder, I started looking for a campsite.  100 ft. from water and trail, that makes it a bit harder.  Well, that and a flat spot for the tent that isn’t in a wash or drainage area.  I found a suitable spot under some fir trees and set up the tent quickly.  The two-person Eureka tent has been a good one.  Lightweight and easy to set up.  The bugs were almost non-existent.  Mosquitoes are bad here in early summer, but this was perfect.  Dinner was a Mountain Home chicken and noodle- too much for one person.  The housekeeping routine when you camp solo is a bit different.  Normally, you split chores like setting up the tent, getting water and cooking but tonight it was all mine.  Within 45 minutes, it started sprinkling and by 7 p.m. a steady rain ensued.  Fortunately, the lightning was distant and the trees seemed to reduce the impact of the rain.

Combined with the drive and a couple of hours of hiking, the rain was a natural sleep machine.  The pitter-patter on the tent was peaceful and the rushing creek was a great combination.  I was asleep by 8:30.

Next: This place has it all

We use the Nikon 3300 series for most of our pics.  An easy to use camera a step up from the entry-level model. Nikon D3300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR with AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Zoom Lens (Black)


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 7 – The Last Day

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Wherever we go in the mountains, or indeed in any of God’s wild fields, we find more than we seek.

John Muir – My First Summer in the Sierra

The last day was bittersweet.  Ready to finish our week on the trail, we broke camp after a light breakfast.  We filtered water at the creek last night and the flow was just a trickle, full of water bugs.  The mosquitoes were relentless at the creek and we were glad that we didn’t camp near there.  Generally, it’s not a great idea to pitch your tent near calm or stagnant water. 🙂

The John Muir trail guide was very helpful as it listed plenty of campsites – all were spot on.  Today, as we made our way toward the Half Dome spur we met a large group on their way back to their base camp.   Seems that the area we stayed in is often used by those who climb the dome.  This group must have left camp around 4 in the morning to climb the rock.  I’m sure Half Dome is a neat experience, it just wasn’t on our itinerary.  Remember, as they say on the A.T. –  “hike your own hike”.

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As we passed the spur trail to Half Dome, we started seeing a lot of people.  Alas, the splendor and solitude of the JMT started to fade.  Within the next 30-45 minutes, we would come across more people than we had seen all week.  It’s probably the main reason we don’t do the main attractions, too many people.

Continuing through Little Yosemite Valley, it seemed like a decent place to camp, but looked crowded.   We have enjoyed the ability to pick out our own campsite on the JMT.   The Merced River came up beside the trail and the smell of jasmine filled the air.  Well, I thought it was jasmine, but they were probably fragrant mountain dogwoods with beautiful white flowers.

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The Merced at this point was leveling out prior to the leap over Nevada Fall, and it was deceitfully calm.  Clear with a slight green tint, this water has traveled many miles from its’ snowy origin.  We passed the junction to Vernal Falls and the Mist Trail and emerged on solid granite.  Dropping our packs, we removed our shoes and dipped our feet in the cool waters.  Some adventurous souls were wading out into the river.  We were probably two hundred yards from the precipice, but it still unnerved me to see people in the water.  Almost every year, someone gets too close and is swept over the edge.  On the other side of the Merced River, a foreign tourist had climbed down and was within 6 feet of the edge.  This was surely a Darwin Award candidate so I took his picture.

We filtered some more water as the day hikers watched.  One gentleman asked me if it was safe to drink.  I explained that if it was filtered, yes.   After a while, my brother and I ventured over and took some pics.  The whirling cascade just puts you in awe of the power.  John Muir captured this with eloquence:

The Nevada is white from its first appearance as it leaps out into the freedom of the air. At the head it presents a twisted appearance, by an overfolding of the current from striking on the side of its channel just before the first free out-bounding leap is made. About two thirds of the way down, the hurrying throng of comet-shaped masses glance on an inclined part of the face of the precipice and are beaten into yet whiter foam, greatly expanded, and sent bounding outward, making an indescribably glorious show, especially when the afternoon sunshine is pouring into it.

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“The Nevada”

Ready to complete our journey, we got back on the trail and began the longest stretch to the valley floor below.  I’m not sure why it seemed long, maybe because we were mentally finished.  The stretch from Nevada to the valley was tough on our tired feet.

The scene at Vernal Fall bridge was chaotic.  People, like ants milled about seemingly without direction.  At least ants have a purpose.  We just wanted to get through the throngs of people so we trudged on.  I am sure that we looked haggard after a week on the trail, but it felt good to be near the end.

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Vernal Fall

The asphalt sidewalk on the Mist Trail was another reminder that we were back in civilization.  It felt awkward to walk on it with our poles clacking about.   “Move over people, make a hole, real hikers coming through!”  I wanted to say that, but my subconscious did not prevail.

At the end, the sign that lists the various trails was our last photo-op.  While the sign showed 211 miles for the JMT, we actually only did our 68 mile section.  It still felt good and I was proud of my wife and brother for completing it.

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The shuttle ride from Happy Isles to the Visitor Center was tough.  Throngs of people made their way on the shuttle and we were separated from my brother.  We eventually found each other and enjoyed a good sandwich from the deli.  The YARTS bus stop is across from the Visitor Center.  In the summer, it leaves once daily at 5 p.m.  from the valley and makes multiple stops on the way to Mammoth Lakes.  For $18, it was a wonderful ride, comfortable with amazing scenery.  Google YARTS and you will find the various schedules.

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This was a good way to get back to our car in Mammoth.

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Emery Lake from the YARTS bus.

For the next few weeks, the memories of the trip would resurface and we would laugh about things that happened.  It was an amazing journey and one that created great memories.  I did push my brother and wife hard on this trip, but they persevered and made it through.  It doesn’t take an athlete to do backcountry hiking.  It takes a desire to explore and the ability to push yourself a bit beyond your limits.

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YouTube slide show of our trip:

Part I – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

Part II – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7zHwNLPY6A


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 6 – Cathedral to Half Dome

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The clouds would burst into color at sunset. Looking north from Lower Cathedral Lake.

“I only went out for a walk, and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in.”
– John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938)

The day at Lower Cathedral was most enjoyable.  While my brother determined that there were no brook or rainbow trout in this part of the lake, we enjoyed watching the sky as clouds would form and morph into a variety of shapes.  One could spend hours lying on their back watching the afternoon cumulus formations come and go.

Alas, we had a goal in mind.  Another 20 or so miles to go between today and tomorrow.  At 9,400 feet and heading into Yosemite Valley it is mostly downhill for us.  A climb out of Cathedral and up to Long Meadow and then our toes would be in for a beating.

As we neared Upper Cathedral, a sign detoured us away from the meadow near the lake.  Years of overuse and erosion had taken its’ toll on this area.  Am pretty sure you can camp here, but the JMT was rerouted a quarter-half mile to the east.

A neat thing about hiking is that depending on the direction you are going, the views can be drastically different.  Occasionally, we would look over our shoulders to catch a glimpse of where we have been.  Cathedral Peak and the upper lake were prominent as we climbed Cathedral Pass.  Farther to the north, we caught glimpses of Pettit Peak and the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River.

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Upper Cathedral Lake, Cathedral Peak.

We entered Long Meadow and were rewarded with a nice respite of flatness and views of the surrounding peaks.  Man, the vistas just never stop here.  If you only have 2-3 days, I would recommend the area between Cathedral and Sunrise Camp. If you have 4-5 days, a loop including Merced and Vogelsang High Sierra Camp looks awesome.

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Long Meadow

A last climb and we would see the rest of the Cathedral Range including Vogelsang and Amelia Earhart Peaks.  We saw our first of what would be many mule trains around the Columbia Finger.  As they passed, we quietly watched and snapped some pics.  Most of the mules today were en route to one of the three local High Sierra camps including Sunrise, Merced and Vogelsang.  These beasts of burden carried between 150-200 lbs of cargo.  Sure footed, they followed their leader at a steady pace.  It’s cool that this is still the primary means of resupply for the remote camps.

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The first of many pack mule trains.

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Is this 1913 or 2013?

As we made our way south, the view of the Cathedral Range opened up.

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We stopped for lunch near Sunrise Camp and filtered some water.   During this backcountry trip, we typically carried two liters since there was plenty of water. As we passed through the meadow near Sunrise, we began a gradual descent through a burned area and saw Half Dome for the first time.  Entering a thickly wooded area, the downhill was steeper and the views diminished.  Several southbound hikers asked about available water.  It’s important to have maps that show the various creeks and streams.  While water was generally abundant, there were many areas where the vernal streams were dry.

Using an excerpt from the JMT guide that showed potential campsites, I started scanning for a suitable location.  I saw movement to my right and initially thought that it was another deer.  It was big and moving slowly.  Hey, a bear!  It was about 75-100 ft. away and rooting around a log.  Glancing over its’ shoulder at us, the bruin ignored us and continued to dig.  It appeared to be an old brown bear around 300 lbs.  We snapped a few photos and moved on.

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Blurry pic of a brown bear on the JMT/PCT. This was about 2 miles south of Half Dome.

Within 10 minutes, we located a site to camp with a view of Half Dome.  This was a busy area, mainly used by campers as a staging area for climbing the rock.  Most of the other campers were out of sight, but you could hear them as well as see the smoke from various campfires.

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This had been a long day and we had one last dinner on the trail.  We started a small fire and enjoyed the peacefulness.

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Sadly, tomorrow would be the end of our seven-day trek. I was getting used to this camping stuff, but looked forward to a real shower. Well, that and maybe a cheeseburger.

Links to a slide show of the hike:

Part I: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

Part II http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7zHwNLPY6A


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 5 – Tuolumne to Lower Cathedral Lake

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Lower Lake Cathedral outlet is one of many that feed Tenaya Lake 1,300 ft. below.

“Going to the mountains is going home.”
― John Muir

On July 4th, we decided to take a pseudo-zero day and hike up to Lower Cathedral Lake where we would relax.  We passed by the Tuolumne Grill in the a.m. and got a wonderful bacon, egg and cheese biscuit.  A quick shuttle to the Cathedral trailhead and we began the relatively short 3.5 mile hike to Lower Cathedral Lake.  Short yes, easy no.  (I left out the part where I almost took out a tourist’ eye on the shuttle with my hiking pole.)  Lesson learned:  When getting on the shuttles/buses, wear your pack, don’t try to carry it.

This is probably the most popular trail with day hikers in the Tuolumne area.  As you near the lake you enter into a meadow and are in the shadow of Cathedral Peak.  There are several creeks feeding the lake.  Most day hikers stop on the eastern shore; we would continue on the north side of the lake and head west to the far end.   We were rewarded with a lakefront campsite and plenty of solitude.  Tip – get there early in the day for your choice of sites.

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After setting up our camp and eating lunch, we did chores.  My brother took one of his waterproof clothing bags and filtered some lake water.  Oila, a washing machine!   Dump the dirty water at least 100 ft. away from the lake and fill the bag with clean filtered water for rinsing.  It was labor intensive, but the clothes came out smelling clean.  We used  Dr. Bronner’s biodegradable Magic Soap and it was great.   I’ve used the peppermint soap in the past which can be used for bathing too.  A clothesline between two dead trees and we were set.  One biohazard Mary discovered was that the bees liked the aroma of the lavender soap on the clothes while they dried.   I had some insect bite/sting paste in my 1st aid kit that does wonders for those stings.  

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Enjoying the sunset on Lower Cathedral Lake.

At the far end of Lower Cathedral Lake, the water is warmer in the shallows of the shore.  No fish in this lake that we could see.  We ventured to the western edge where the lake’s outlet is and viewed Tenaya Lake 1,300 ft. below.   The flows from Cathedral are one of many that make their way to the glacier made Tenaya.   The Yosemite Indians actually called it Pywiack, meaning shining rock.  The white man renamed it Tenaya after the Indian chief who fled here from soldiers one spring.

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Sunset on Cathedral Peak

We would enjoy the remainder of our day at Lower Cathedral.  Our Independence Day celebration concluded with fireworks presented by God.  The sky to the west of the lake was most spectacular.  I highly recommend spending the night here.  Bring mosquito head nets and some bug repellant, as it can get a bit buggy.

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Now this is a 4th of July show.

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As the world turned during our peaceful night, the sun would greet us by silhouetting Cathedral. What a glorious place.

Tomorrow, we are determined to put in some mileage.  Tonight, we would sleep soundly in the quiet surroundings of another lake.

Links to a slide show of the hike:

Part I: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

Part II http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7zHwNLPY6A

John says it best:  ….Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on seas and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.

– John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938), page 438.


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 4 – Donahue Pass to Tuolumne Meadows

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Lyell Canyon

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul.”
― John Muir

This day should have been called “The Race to Tuolumne”.  It was July 3rd and we were trying to make it to the Tuolumne post office to retrieve our resupply package before it closed at 4. While a stop in Tuolumne Meadows would be nice, we didn’t want to spend the holiday on the 4th waiting around for a package.

Tuolumne Meadows is a great place to hang out, but a zero day around the Cathedral Lakes would be ideal.  Getting our usual late start, we were on the trail and looking forward to the flat paths of Lyell Canyon.  We had to drop around 500 ft. and enjoyed the relative shade of the pines as we followed the river.

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A pregnant doe grazing in the forest

We noticed a large deer grazing in the distance.  It was a pregnant doe who kept one eye on us, but wasn’t very concerned.  These creatures have few predators in Yosemite.

As the terrain flattened out, we picked up the pace and the sun was beaming down.  It was hot as the path meandered in and out of the forest.  To our left, Amelia Earhart Peak loomed over us.  We would see this ridge from another angle as the trail would do a horseshoe after Tuolumne.  Distant rumblings of early afternoon thunderstorms were behind  and to the west of us.  We passed an area where day hikers from Tuolumne had gathered around a nice area on the river.  The number of people increased as we closed in on Tioga Road.

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As we neared Tuolumne, the thunder was more frequent and louder.  A fairly close crack of thunder prompted us to spread out a bit as we picked up the pace.  Occasional large splatters of rain filtered down through the pines.  We crossed a couple of foot-bridges where the Lyell Fork neared the main branch of the Tuolumne River.  We emerged in the parking lot near the lodge and started walking down the road.  It was strange to be in civilization after days on the trail.

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A local worker from the Tuolumne Meadows store graciously gave us a ride to the post office.  As we pulled into the parking area, the scene was chaotic.  Tourists and hikers were like ants swarming around the store.  It took a few minutes to absorb the busy surroundings.  Near the road was a collection of picnic tables where thru-hikers lounged around.  A family sat at one of the tables listening to a PCT hiker expound on his trail life.   It was like storytime at the preschool.  Other hikers were going through their resupply packages.

We would get some refreshments and pick up our packages at the window.  The post office here was a small room with a window on the outside of the store.  The clerk was friendly and politely asked if we could open our packages over where the thru-hikers were.  We obliged, and noticed the grill.  The thought of  cheeseburgers and fries was too much.  We gave in to our cravings and enjoyed the greasy goodness.  Mmmmm.

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Tuolumne Store, Post Office, Grill. (photo credit-tahoewhitney.com)

We made our way to the backpackers camp.  It’s first come first serve and $5 per camper.  We found out how many hikers are moochers and “stealth camp”.  You know the ones who are too cheap to pay the fee.  Bathrooms are at a premium here – only one within walking distance of the camp and it was uber-busy.  Bring a flashlight, no electricity in these rustic restrooms.

At 8:00 p.m. a ranger hosts a campfire in the amphitheater near the backpacker’s camp. Ranger Sally provided an excellent presentation of Yosemite history and we learned a lot about owls.  We really enjoyed hanging out and laughing at other campers who participated in the campfire.

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One of 7 sunrises.

Even though Tuolumne Meadows was much lower in altitude than our previous campsites, it was the coolest night yet.  Temps dipped into the 40’s as we snuggled deep in our sleeping bags.  Tomorrow, we would head up to Cathedral and enjoy some downtime.

For a slideshow of the part 1 of the hike, you can go here:

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 3 – Thousand Island Lake to Donahue Pass

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One of many marmots.

First half slideshow of our hike:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

The continuing story of our northbound JMT section hike…..

By day 3, we all had our trail legs.  You know what I mean, the steadiness that you get after a few days of stepping on, around and over stuff.  Backpacks have a way of changing your center of gravity.  Bend over a bit too far to smell those lupines and you’ll see how blue they really are.  The night at Thousand Island Lake was amazing.  The sound of the distant snow-fed waterfall created a peaceful nights’ rest.

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Floating islands at Island Pass.

At Thousand Island, it was a bit difficult to find a private place to do your business.  Sorry for bringing it up, but it’s just one of those things that you have to do.  One could write an entire blog about it, but I’ll spare you the details.  Let’s just say that sometimes you have to venture out to find that secluded spot and hope that the nearest trail is out of view.  It is arguably one of the most challenging yet natural chores in the backcountry.  Mosquitoes present a significant challenge with this, so you may need to apply some repellant where the “sun don’t shine”.  The cathole shovel, tp and antiseptic wipes are essential gear.  However, in a pinch so are a stick, leaves and some handfuls of dirt.  Let’s leave it at that.

We admired the view from our campsite and did the usual tasks.  Filtering water, making breakfast, tearing down camp and repacking those packs.  The last task was usually the biggest pain.  Packing around those bear canisters is like emptying a sardine can and then stuffing them back in.  The climb out of Thousand Island Lake was steady and hot.  The views over our shoulders of Banner Peak were ever-changing and dramatic.  As we rounded a ledge, a fat marmot sat perched on a rock and it looked like a good place to stop.  This is their territory and the scat is enough to prove it.    Pausing occasionally to catch our breath, we would hunch over to shift the weight of the pack and lean on our poles.  It was a funny sight for sure.  Island Pass was like something out of a movie.  Little archipelagos of grass seemingly floated around us.  Birds were abundant here as were so many varieties of flowers.   This area made me regret that we had to cover 10 miles today.

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We descended into an area near Wough Lake and heard rumblings of thunderstorms.  The skies to the north were menacing and I kept an eye on the direction it was moving.  We discussed what our plan would be for inclement weather, especially if caught out in the open.  Things like avoiding meadows, tall trees and shallow caves if lightning is nearby.  Lightning is a strange and dangerous occurrence and you should have a plan whether you are alone or hiking in a group.  In a group, it’s a good idea to spread out so a stray bolt doesn’t take everyone out.   If possible, find a clump of medium-sized trees for shelter.  The tallest and shortest trees are not advisable.   The position for protection is simple.  Sit on your backpack or sleeping pad with your two feet touching the ground or pad.  Don’t lay or stand up if possible.  If in a tent, do the same and don’t touch your tent frame.  Enough of the morbidity, you can do some research on hiking and lightning.  It is “enlightening”.

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We would cross several streams over single logs perched 6-8 feet above rushing streams and creeks.  It requires a sense of balance with a pack and if you are unsteady should consider having a mate take your pack across for you.  Something about a skinny log, sights and sounds of roaring water can unnerve almost anyone.

We passed through a canyon and ran into a large group from Tennessee.  They proceeded to tell us how they were pummeled by hail and rain for 1 1/2 hours.  I must say, God protected our little group because we avoided bad weather all week.  Either way, be prepared.  We started the steady climb up Donahue Pass and a 80% cloud cover made it much more comfortable as we were totally exposed.  The trail is well-defined and there are plenty of boulders to take breaks on.  We ran across a couple of SoBo’s (southbounders) who provided upcoming trail conditions.  We did the same.  It’s very common to briefly stop and chat to discuss weather, trail conditions and experiences.  People who are out here most often share our appreciation for the outdoors and generally are friendly with good attitudes.   While I still scratch my head when we come across solo female hikers, they are safer out here than in their urban neighborhoods.

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We would also run across a PCT thru-hiker who was disappointed that he wasn’t going to be able to walk 30 miles today.  Man, I thought we were doing good at 10 miles per day.

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Reaching the Pass, we would tread across the last remnants of snow fields and cross into Yosemite territory.

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The trail becomes a bit hard to follow on the north side of Donahue as you cross more snow.  Some cairns indicated the general direction.

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We quickly descended into the beginnings of Lyell Canyon.  The landscape, ever-changing was devoid of all but the hardiest of vegetation.  The hiking poles made the descent easier as we snaked our way down.  Forty five minutes later, we reached a wide creek and realized that we would have to ford it.  Two hundred feet downstream was a waterfall and cascade, so no crossing there.  We put on our water shoes and stepped in the cold creek that would become the Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne.  Here, underneath the snow of Donahue Pass, the water was a chili 40-45 degrees.

_DSC0112  I crossed without incident, my wife mentioned that her feet were getting numb within 30-45 seconds.  When fording water, it’s best to unbuckle your pack in case you fall since it can absorb water and drag you under.   It took a bit to warm up from the creek as I imagined what it would have been like if there had been a heavy snow year.

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We would cross countless tributaries to this creek as we ventured further in the valley.   Some streams were cutting across the trail on a ledge that was five feet wide.  Rock hopping was common and we definitely got better at it.  We would also cross the creek twice more before finding a campsite.   At the last crossing, we did it in our hiking shoes.  My shoes, while excellent on the trail, were not waterproof.

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We made camp around 100 ft. from the water in a beautiful stand of pines within earshot of the cascades.  The sun was setting quickly as we ended a tough day on the trail.  Dinner was spicy beef stew.  We slept like hibernating bears.  Tomorrow, July 3rd would be a race to Tuolumne Post Office to retrieve our supplies.


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 2 – Rosalie Lake to Thousand Island Lake

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See a YouTube slide show of the first half of the hike here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

The first full day of hiking on the JMT was enjoyable but tough.  On any extended backcountry trip,  mileage is important.  It’s good to have a zero day planned in your itinerary just in case you are coming up short each day.  Our goal was to do 9-10 miles per day.  For a seasoned hiker,  easy enough – right?  Well let me tell you from experience,  pack weight is everything.  If your pack is heavy, your speed and distance drop.  Anyhow, I tend to err on the side of caution and bring a few extra things .  Bottom line is you will determine what you absolutely need because the extra weight will slow you down.

We would have a good breakfast of eggs and bacon before leaving Rosalie Lake. My brother would fish a bit and pull in a couple of rainbow trout.  As would be the norm for our week, we would break camp late and hit the trail by midmorning.  No need to rush out here, you just hike until you want to stop.  Yesterday’s climb of 1,800 ft  brought us up to our current altitude of 9,400.  Today, we would have a handful of SUDS (senseless ups/downs before going back up to around 10,000.

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There is water everywhere in this section of the JMT in July.  Brooks, streams, creeks, rivers, ponds, tarns, lakes – omigosh.  Even with minimum snow this year, this area has plenty in early summer. We would pass Shadow Lake,  which appeared to be approx. 1,000 meters  long and 300-400 m wide.  The views were really beginning to open up now.  As we passed to the south and west of Shadow Lake, we came upon Shadow Creek which we would follow for a few miles.  Its’ cascades were fast and amazing.  Something about fast-moving water just leaves you in awe.  The noise and the way the current flows around rocks and down the gullies is so cool.  Around every turn was another beautiful view.  We would see Banner Peak and Mt Ritter in the distance, both majestic in their own accord.

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We would leave the cascades of Shadow Creek and began a steady 1,400 foot climb into a canyon that seemed to have a dead-end.  The boulders and scree were large as we picked our way to the top of the canyon.  The wind really picked up and was gusting 20-30mph. It was starting to sprinkle a bit.  Nearing lunchtime, we found a tarn with a small stand of trees that offered some shelter.  Garnet Lake was below and in the distance, there were numerous dark cumulus clouds.  We need to keep an eye on those clouds.  One thing I’ve learned is to avoid peaks and passes during mid-day storms.  In the Sierras, summer afternoon thunderstorms are common, especially when it has been hot.  The heat wave that hit the Sierras created a recipe for strong storms.  We would have our lunch amidst the little trees while the wind buffeted us as we held our belongings.  We broke out the rain gear as intermittent sprinkles were pelting us.  Below on Garnet Lake, you could see whitecaps blowing across the lake.  There was some serious wind down there.

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The wind calmed a bit as we got back on the trail and descended to the lake.  We met a rider and his mule who said that his animal would not cross the log bridge across the Garnet Lake Outlet.  Another southbound hiker said earlier the winds around the lake were gusting between 40-50 mph.  Well, that will take your toupee’ off.  Filtering some water, we started a hot climb out of Garnet and topped out around 10,400 ft.  The afternoon sun and heat really saps the energy.  We prayed for some cloud cover and were rewarded with a nice forest covering before we descended to Ruby Lake. Quite a few nice campsites around this little lake, but we wanted to go a bit farther.  We use this Katadyn water filter, it is fantastic: Katadyn Vario Multi Flow Water Microfilter

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We were reaching the end of our hiking day as we neared Emerald Lake.  It was an awesome lake, but camping was prohibited between here and Thousand Island Lake to the northwest.  I scouted out some sites nearby, not realizing that it was still a no camping zone.  Dropping my pack at the top of a granite outcropping, I went back a few hundred yards to tell my wife and brother about the potential sites.  Another southbounder reminded them about the no-camping zones around these lakes.  Drat, I had found a nice spot with killer views.  Oh well, there is a side trail on the north side of Thousand Island, we will go there.  As I returned to retrieve my pack, I noticed a big fat marmot sniffing my pack.  Still a hundred yards away, I yelled but it ignored me.  For some reason I thought about the gophers in Caddyshack.  I started running up the granite slope and picked up a few rocks which I threw at the vermin.  He trotted off, fussing at me.  “Au revoir gopher”.

Fortunately, I made it to my pack before it was pillaged.  Lesson learned, don’t leave your pack alone for long – especially if there’s food in it.   The lake below was the best one yet.  We made our way west on a side trail and began looking for a site.  You have to hike another half mile or so and if you get there late, most of the good sites have been taken.  We did find a granite slab about 100 ft. from the lake and it was stellar.  If you hike the JMT, I highly recommend camping around Thousand Island Lake.  The mosquitoes were bad, but ourheadnets and long sleeves kept them at bay.  I imagine that there are less bloodsuckers in late Aug/early September.  To cut down on mosquitoes, we treated our stuff with Permethrin: Sawyer Products Premium Permethrin Clothing Insect Repellent Trigger Spray, 24-Ounce

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We were bushed and actually ate dinner in our tents.  The cool night air wafted through our tents.  Sleep would come quickly…..

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John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 1 – Devils Postpile to Rosalie Lake

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Link to YouTube slideshow:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

If you’ve ever camped near rushing water you may understand that it’s like taking a sleeping pill.   In the Sierras near Mammoth, the San Joaquin River is small as rivers go, but grows as it makes its way west.   It is born at Thousand Island Lake where we would camp on day 2.   As the San Joaquin descends into Devils Postpile, the cascades provide some character to the little river branch before it provides vital nourishment to the California Central Valley.

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We were awakened by the dawn light as it filtered through the trees in the campground.  Breakfast would be scrambled eggs and bacon.  Food is a priority for me in the backcountry.  I found out about these crystallized eggs and pre-cooked bacon from Backpackers magazine.  The eggs are real, in powdered form and when mixed with water – come to life when heat is applied.  These aren’t the old-school powdered eggs, they are the real deal.   The bacon is real and just reheated.  Put two checks in the protein box for today.   Only thing missing was toast, but that’s ok.  We would have to get our carbs from the pita bread and snack bars.

We packed up our site and headed toward the Devils Postpile Monument less than a half mile up the trail.  Afterward, we would hit the JMT and head north.  We would be one of the odd 10% of JMT hikers that go north.  It just worked out that way mainly for logistics.   Devils Postpile is an amazing display of a geologic formation of lava that cooled in long geometric columns.  Definitely worth a side visit.  We would run into a family that was hiking the JMT from north to south and they proceeded to tell us about the onslaught of mosquitos.  A couple of the younger women had 50 or 60 bites – on their arms.  Hmmm, either bug repellant wasn’t applied, or these are mosquitos from Hades.  They also told us how a bear tore into their non-food bags that were hanging from trees in Lyell Canyon.   I wasn’t fazed by these tales of woe, thanked them for the info and looked forward to meeting the challenge (and our dementors) head on.

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We made our way up the hill several hundred yards before I realized we were going south.  Oops, the morning sun was on my left – that’s not right.  I flipped my map around, apologized and asked everyone if they were warmed up yet.  I felt like Dr Lazarus in the movie Galaxy Quest, when he was reading his tricorder thingy backwards.    We found the JMT junction and crossed the San Joaquin on a nice footbridge.  My brother and I brought our DSLR cameras on this trip, the extra 2 pounds worth it since we knew about the vistas that lay ahead.  The trail wasted no time increasing elevation as we left the river and the mid-morning heat was on.  We peeled off a layer and unzipped the legs off our pants.  A bit of sunscreen and bug repellant and we were on our way.  Much of this area was devastated by a freak windstorm last year and required much trail maintenance to clear the blow-downs.   I was impressed at the amount of work done to restore the trail.  Kudos to the Forest Service employees and their army of volunteers.

Our packs were heavy with our full complement of food.  We would carry 2 liters of water and a spare .75 liter bottle.  Prior to hitting the trail, we would tank up – drinking as much as was comfortable.  Hydration is everything when you hike, especially when your body is working hard at altitude with a heavy load.   Pulling my Tom Harrison map out, I would occasionally check our position and compare the various landmarks.  Eventually, the JMT and PCT split and we would go left to follow the JMT toward a land of lakes.

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The trail was fairly steep at 400-500 ft per mile and came with an array of SUDS (senseless up-downs).  In a hikers’ mind, you should go up or down, not both.   We could hear the cascades of the river below and see waterfalls in the distance.   We cinched the shoulder harnesses and load balancers to bring the packs closer to our shoulders as the incline seemed relentless.   With a full pack, comfort is not really an option.  You shift the load from hips to shoulders and move the pain points around.  General rule is uphill-bring the load in close to your shoulders, downhill-shift it to your hips.  Always a good idea to play around with waist-shoulder-sternum-load balancer straps as you hike.  All good quality backpacks have those adjustments.  It takes practice to adjust those while holding hiking poles, sipping water and keeping your eye on the trail.

As the GPS altimeter continued to click up, I glanced again at the maps.  The Harrison maps have great detail, but man it was hard to make out those contour lines.  As we approached 10,000 ft later in the day, we realized that we should look for a camp near a water source.  That wouldn’t be too hard since there was water everywhere.  I knew enough to avoid ponds since their still waters are just breeding grounds for mosquitoes.  I had cut out select pages of the John Muir Trail: The essential guide to hiking America’s most famous trail, which listed elevation profiles and campsite coördinates along the JMT.  It is an invaluable guide and highly recommended.

The guide recommended an area near the Rosalie Lake outlet and it was spot on.  There was evidence of a previous camp close by a stream.  Too bad we couldn’t make use of the fire ring since there is a moratorium on campfires in the Inyo National Forest.

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The campsite was full of those big black carpenter ants.  They are pretty harmless from what I remember unless you get close to their colony.  They are persistent and get into everything that isn’t sealed up.  We learned to co-exist with these critters.  One thing, you can’t be afraid of bugs in the backcountry.  In the Sierras, most are harmless and bug repellant with 33% Deet works ok.  Be careful with the 100% Deet, it melts most plastics.  Another thing worth mentioning is that prior to our trip I sprayed our outer garments with Permethrin.  I’ve used this on the A.T. and it works great as most bugs will bounce off your clothes-especially ticks.  It also is effective for up to six washings.  It can be applied to your tent or tarp too.

Dinner was a Mountain Home Chicken & Mashed Potatoes.  It’s a good one, four stars.  We would wind down our day chatting about how hard the first day was.  I told everyone how well they did on the trail and that it would eventually get easier.  It didn’t get easier until the last day…

The mosquitos were definitely in charge here, but our headnets and long sleeves/pants kept them at bay.  As the night cooled and the breeze picked up, their numbers diminished.  The heat of the day was gone and the coolness of Rosalie Lake wafted over our campsite.  Temps would drop into the low 50’s at 9,500 ft.  The lake outlet was a babbling brook which made it so easy to sleep.  If at all possible, seek out those streams, they are nature’s sleep machine.

Late at night, we would see flashes of light through our tent.  Why do strange things happen late at night?  I was concerned about a forest fire, so I unzipped the tent to watch the sky.  To the south – southeast, it appeared to be fireworks.  It was only June 30th, but some town must have gotten an early start.  Maybe there was something going on in Mammoth Lakes.

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Gear we recommend:

shoes/boots –Five Ten Men’s Camp Four Hiking Shoe

hiking pants – Columbia Men’s Silver Ridge Cargo Short

I use a Nikon 3000 series camera and have really been pleased with it.  It is easy to use and takes awesome pictures.  It’s durable and has survived many hiking and camping trips.  Nikon D3200 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-200mm Non-VR DX Zoom Lenses Bundle


John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 0 – Devils Postpile

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The big day was here.  Anyone who has ever hiked in the Sierras can tell you the allure of these mountains.  The vistas are like fuel for the soul.  This trip was planned about six months ago.  We decided to do a south-north section hike of the JMT starting in the Mammoth Lakes area and ending up in Yosemite Valley.  90% of hikers do the north-south route and finish at Mt. Whitney.  While that fourteener is on the list, this trip was meant to enjoy a seven-day trek up the legendary trail.

My friend obtained the permit through the recreation.gov website ahead of time.  He couldn’t make it, but listed me as an alternate group leader which made picking up the permit easier.  I will not go into detail, but if you don’t need to climb Whitney or Half Dome, obtaining the permit is very easy online.  Overall, the fee for four people online was $26, which included a processing fee.  At the Wilderness Centers or ranger stations, it is around $5 per person.  There is no guarantee of trail availability for walk-ins, so plan accordingly.

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Campsite at Devils Postpile.

Since my friend could not make it, I asked my trusty hiking partner – aka my wife to go.  She reluctantly said yes!  We also asked my older brother who said that it was on his bucket list.  Early morning, June 29th we left suburban San Diego heading toward Mammoth Lakes.  Today was a hot one, with forecasts putting the temps between 100-110 degrees in the Owens Valley area.  Mammoth was projected to be in the 90’s. Whew!

We picked up our permit at the Mammoth Visitor Center and spoiled ourselves with a burger at a local tourist trap before heading to Mammoth Lakes Inn to catch the Reds Meadow Shuttle.  The shuttle was $7 and would drop us at our choice of campgrounds.  We chose to stay at Devils PostPile Campground.  At $14, it was a good bargain and had nice sites located close to the San Joaquin River.   We pitched our tents and settled in for a leisurely night before our first hiking day.  The camp has bathrooms, potable water, picnic tables and fire rings.  This was luxury camping to us compared to the rest of the week.  You can tent or RV camp.

We would try out our first dehydrated dinner at the camp.  It was an Alpineaire Black Bart Chili.  Yummm.  We hung out by the river, my brother trying his hand at fly fishing.  Discussing tomorrow’s itinerary, we would rest well with the sound of the cascading San Joaquin River 100 ft. away.

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Sun setting on the small San Joaquin River.

Temps are forecast to be in the 80’s tomorrow.  Hopefully, as we climb out the temps will drop between 3-5 degrees for each 1,000 ft.  Oh well, at least there is plenty of water up here.

Next:  Section Hike of the JMT – Day 1


Planning for a Section Hike of the John Muir Trail

jmt-logo3.5x3.5-11-08-07After much preparation, our section hike of the JMT commenced.  Our plan was to do a 60+ mile section from south-north.  We would start around Devils Postpile and finish in Yosemite Valley.  There are a lot of logistics that go into an extended backcountry trip.  From clothing, food, transportation – the options are numerous.

How much will it cost?  It will vary widely depending on your choices for transportation, gear and food.  Don’t go cheap on essential hiking gear.  You get what you pay for.  The $25 tent is not a good idea for a High Sierra backcountry trip.

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It started with choosing a time of year to do it.  In the Sierras, the previous winter has a lot of impact on trail conditions.  This year was a low snow year, so the streams were not very high.  Since there was less snow, that usually means less standing water so mosquitos should not be as bad.  Well, that’s debatable.  To some, any mosquitos are bad.  Ensure that you don’t have problems fording streams or walking across logs over rushing water.  Late June/early July worked for us.  I hear late August/early September is a good time.

Next choice was the distance to hike.  This is where you need to know what your limits are.  Can you hike 8-10 miles per day with a full pack at high altitude in 80 degree temps?  I can tell you as an avid day hiker, there is a lot of difference between hiking 10 miles with a daypack and with a 40 lb. pack.  It’s not pleasant to do a forced march just to make your mileage.

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Clothing was another choice.  What to wear?  Best advice I can give is to check blogs and user groups to see what others are doing.  Yahoo has a great JMT user group with relevant info.  Due to a forecast of high temps, we would take synthetic short and long sleeve shirts, convertible pants and rain/wind jackets.  Still, conditions in the Sierras vary widely, so an extra layer or two is a good idea.  Those light weight hiking shoes may not provide enough support on a multi-day hike with a full pack.  Test it out first.

Food was next.  Dehydrated meals are the easiest and they’ve come a long way.  Test some out ahead of time and read the reviews for each.  There is some amazing innovation in the area of crystallized eggs and pre-cooked bacon.  Ensure they you have plenty of snacks like energy bars, trail mix, beef sticks and fruits like apples.  My wife found healthy alternatives in the form of grass fed beef sticks and even some gluten free snacks.  It’s amazing how many calories you can burn in 6-8 hours of hiking, so do the math.  Bear canisters are mandatory in most areas on the JMT, so plan to rent or bring your own.

Transportation.  Since we were doing a section hike, we chose to leave our car in Mammoth Lakes, catch a shuttle to the trail and for the return leg, catch public transportation (YARTS) back to Mammoth.  It ended up working out great.  Have a backup plan in case you miss your ride.

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Research and planning was everything on this trip which helped make it successful.  I learned so much reading others’ blogs and experiences.

NEXT:  John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 0

I use a Nikon 3000 series camera and have really been pleased with it.  It is easy to use and takes awesome pictures.  It’s durable and has survived many hiking and camping trips.  Nikon D3200 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-200mm Non-VR DX Zoom Lenses Bundle


Packing a Bear Canister, Unpacking a Bear Canister

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Yes honey, it will all fit.

As we prepare for our section hike of the JMT,  I am enjoying watching my wife pack, unpack the bear canister.  Her frustration mounting, I assure her that it will all fit or we will hang the non-essentials from a tree.  Hopefully, by the time we hit Yosemite where bears come to feast, we will have mostly empty bear cans.   Whoever created the saying it’s like packing 10 pounds of “stuff” in a 5 pound bag must have invented the bear canister.

The logistics of a section hike in the backcountry are significant.  Permits, transportation, food, clothing, checklists, on and on….  Watching her pack, it’s obvious that organized people can get more in their canisters than the rest of us.  If you’ve ever crammed a bear canister into an ultralight backpack, you realize that you may be wearing the same clothing all week because it’s either food or clothing.

Keep in mind the pack-it-in, pack-it-out rule.  While I agree that we should be good stewards and not leave our trash in the wilderness, it literally stinks to carry your garbage around for a week.  I would advise that you rinse out those foil tuna packs after you empty them or your apples will smell like Chicken-of-the-Sea by day three.

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This is why you need a bear can in Yosemite.

Should you pack your bear can with each day’s meals?  Like day 5 on the bottom, day 4 above that and so on.  I guess if you are OCD then yes.  Otherwise, it’s fun finding your food, kind of like the treat in the bottom of a Crackerjack box.

When I got our bear cans, by the way I picked two different types, a Garcia and a Bearvault, I got some reflective tape and made smiley face designs on them.  That way, if we need to find a bear can in the dark after Yogi rolls it away,  it will be smiling back at us.  Along with my phone number, I added a little graffiti like “eat me” and “sorry Yogi” on the reflective tape with a Sharpie.  If I have to use those darn things, I will make the best of it.

The old standby canister used by the Park Service: Backpackers’ Cache – Bear Proof Container

BearVault BV500 Bear Proof Container Bear Vault  – This one is my favorite, roomy and you can see your stuff.

Always stow your bear canisters between 50-100 ft. away from your tent and wedge them between rocks or trees.  Never place them around a cliff or near water unless you plan on fasting for a few days.  Enjoy packing them, practice or watch others pack a bear can for cheap entertainment.  It’s better than watching Duck Dynasty.


Mount San Gorgonio – A Three Day Journey – Day 3

Momyer Creek going down

It’s funny how much time you waste piddling around the campsite.  By the time we loaded up, it was almost 9 a.m.  We had a 7 mile descent ahead.  Other than the difficulty of carrying a full load uphill, going down is harder.  You tend to slip more and your toes feel like they’re coming out the front of your shoe.  The talus was steep and the trail angled, which caused us to compensate by putting more weight on the uphill foot.  It was slow going but we were ready to finish this.  The focus required to maintain footing was intense.  When you think about every step on this terrain being calculated, your brain gets a real workout too.

The volunteer trail crews have done an amazing job out here.  On a previous scouting hike of Momyer Creek Trail, I counted no less than 10 blow-downs blocking the trail.  By Memorial Day, they had cleared them all.   Sometimes, I will make a note on the position of a trail issue and report it back to the ranger station on the way out.  The hiking community is tight-knit and are good stewards of the trail.  By noon, the exposed areas on the trail were heating up.  It was a blessing to go in and out of the forest as the temps would drop 5-10 degrees in the shade.

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Toward the end, we started to run into day-hikers and people who seemed to be out for a stroll.  As we neared Mill Creek, we heard groups of people and lots of kids.  We passed a family heading uphill, their daughter asking us “where the river was?”  “River? Oh, you mean Alger Creek, it’s 3.7 miles that-a-way.”    I doubt they made it that far as they towed an elderly woman who was inching along.  They also had their sodas and snacks in a clear trash bag.   Please don’t take me wrong, I don’t mean to make fun of them, it’s the contrast between a few days away from society and being thrust into an urban picnic.  We came across another family and after we told them about our 27 mile hike, the daughter asked to take our picture.  Of course, we agreed.  Wow, we were puffed up now!

We entered Mill Creek Wash and the atmosphere was that of a park, with people gathered around the creek, umbrellas, blankets and picnic supplies.  It was too much for us – as in culture shock too much.   Civilization smacked us right in the face.  What we saw as a simple wash with a creek running through it became a beach front resort to the people of metro San Bernardino.

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After getting back to the car, we laughed for a long time about what we just witnessed.  Imagine, going into the backcountry for a few days without having time to acclimate to society.  We still giggle about it.  In the end, our trip to Gorgonio was hard, but great practice for the JMT.  Time spent together as a couple was primo.   Taking the bear canisters gave Mary an idea what it was like to pack everything (including trash) in a can.  One more hike up San Jacinto and we will be ready for one of the best treks in the country.

The scene at Mill Creek showed us one thing – people love to get out and away from the city.  Imagine how much more fun it is to venture a few miles out.  I encourage you to go higher and farther.  Amazing times await you…


Mount San Gorgonio – A Three Day Journey – Day 2

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Day hiking is definitely a good way to warm up for section hiking.  Just like car camping is a good way to warm up for wilderness camping.  At least that’s how we approach it.

The first day up Momyer Creek Trail was a challenge.  With 3,000 ft. of elevation gain and difficult terrain, we were ready for a quiet night.  Our first task after getting camp set up was to get water for dinner and the next day’s trek.  I’ve had a Sawyer 2-bag water filtration system for a few years now and it is dependable, albeit a bit bulky for two people.  It does require an adequate water source and doesn’t work well in small puddles.  The gravity feed from the dirty bag to the clean bag through the filter is slow and takes awhile to filter 6-7 liters.

Dinner consisted of dehydrated meals.  Mountain House makes some decent ones that are fairly palatable. We use the portable Pocket Rocket stove with propane-butane fuel.   Also found a MSR knockoff stove to use as a backup.

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We settled in for the night into our tent as the temperature dropped quickly.   After a full day of hiking, it’s amazing how fast you can go to sleep.  The first night takes some getting used to, kinda of like sleeping in a strange room or hotel.  Zzzzzzzzzzzzz.  At first, the sound of the helicopter was distant as we heard it pass through nearby canyons.  Suddenly, the sound of the blades were overhead, followed by a bright searchlight.  I was like, what the heck?  I unzipped the door to the tent to see what was going on when the searchlight illuminated me like a Sci-Fi movie where the spaceship beams you up.   The pilot announced through his speaker that they were looking for a lost hiker.   I shook my head no,  and the pilot proceeded a couple of hundred yards uphill where he lit up the camp were the boy scouts were.   This continued for about 10 more minutes and then it was gone.  That was midnight.  The rest of the evening was uneventful. We never did find out who was lost.

Morning was brisk and breakfast consisted of crystallized eggs and pre-cooked bacon.  Crystallized eggs, sounds yucky huh?  Actually it is one of the best inventions in a long time when it comes to freeze-dried type food.  I don’t know how they do it, but when mixed with water and cooked in a skillet, it is exactly like scrambled eggs.  Well, they are eggs. The pre-cooked bacon was also near normal taste and texture.  Overall, a tasty breakfast with hot tea.  Maybe coffee next time.

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Today, we would hike from our base camp at 8,400 ft. to the summit at 11,500.  I had Mary drop her main pack and carry a Camelbak hydration pack that I use for mountain biking.  I dumped most of the stuff out of my backpack and used it to carry our days’ supplies.   We hit the trail and continued through a sub-alpine forest before emerging on the edge of a meadow.  Another small stream a mile away provided the last water until our return leg. Crossing above Plummer’s Meadow, we would see the first of many awesome views that day.   The switchbacks up to Dollar Lake Saddle junction were steady and steep.  This portion of the trail gained about 700 ft. per mile.

At the junction, we ran into a group of boy scouts trying to melt some snow.  They had quite the quandary as they did not bring adequate water with them for the summit.   It takes a lot of fuel to melt snow and in the end, I believe they failed to make the top that day.  Planning, especially water – is everything on this mountain.

As we continued, the elevation ticked off, 9,000, 10,000…  No altitude sickness today.  It helped that we camped above 8,000 ft. last night to get acclimated.  Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is nothing to mess with.  It could begin with a persistent headache, nausea or dizziness and can affect the healthiest of people.  Don’t confuse it with a hangover because the symptoms are the same!  For a mild case, often hydrating and a couple of ibuprofen help.  For persistent or worse symptoms, the only cure is to descend.

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We could see Mt. Baldy on one of the switchbacks and the views only got better.  We passed through the last trail camp and the tree-line was around 10,700.   Up the next switchback, Mt. San Jacinto came into view.  The closest of the Three Sisters, its’ majestic peak stands out as a sentinel to the sprawling desert below.  Streaks of snow remain at her higher elevations.  The trail intersected with Vivian Creek Trail, the shortest-steepest route to the summit.  We began to see more people as the trails converged on the summit like freeway ramps.

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Near the summit. I was dragging at this point.

There are several false summits along the way.  Unless you’ve been there before, each view to a taller hill appears to be the top.  It’s only when you see people nestled in the boulders like eagles on their nests do you realize you are there.  We would take our pics, write in the journal, text our families and have lunch right there – only feet away from people you’ve never met before.  The summit had a celebratory atmosphere to it, with everyone smiling and quietly chatting.

You could see for miles or as far as the L.A. smog would let you see to the west.  It actually wasn’t that bad today.   Big Bear Lake to the north, the high desert to the east and the Peninsular Mountain chain farther south.  By the time we left, there were over 100 people up there.  Oh well, it is Memorial Day weekend.

The six-mile trip down was pleasant as we would run in to a few more people making their way up to camp at the top.   We did not see anyone else after two miles.    The constant downhill was harder on the feet and we took a “foot break” at Dollar Lake Saddle.  There was a cool breeze as we aired out our socks.  The  pounding takes a toll on your arches and toes.

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By the time we got to camp, we had logged 12 miles and were ready to eat dinner and crash.  After filling up our reservoirs at the creek, we had a spicy Mountain House chili meal.  It was actually pretty good and one bag was enough for two people.  Well, one hungry dude could probably eat the whole thing.  After cleaning up, we nestled into the tent around 8:00 with the intent to relax and read a bit.  By 8:30 we were in la-la land.

I would be awakened some time later by a bright light next to my head on the outside of the tent.  “What is that?”  Mary was like – “huh?”  I said “that light, what is it?”  The flashlight in my backpack pocket must be on I thought.  I unzipped the tent and stepped out into the chilly night air.  The full moon in all its’ glory had crested the ridge and lit up our tent like the spotlight from the rescue chopper.  We laughed and went back to bed.

The wind picked up a bit that night and made a soothing sound as it passed through the conifers on the exposed ridges.  Soothing, but a bit eerie as the pitch would vary.   Our campsite was on a downhill slope and not affected by the wind.  Eventually, we would drift off only to be awakened by the woodland birds at dawn.  Most were pleasant to listen to, except for the woodpecker.

Next:  Mount San Gorgonio – A Three Day Journey – Day 3:  Talus Is Hard To Walk On.


Mount San Gorgonio – A Three Day Journey – Day 1

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Plummer’s Meadow, Momyer Creek Trail

As part of our workup to a section hike of the John Muir Trail this summer, Mary and I decided to do a 3 day practice hike to the summit of Mt San Gorgonio via the Momyer Creek Trail.   The tallest of the Three Sisters (San Antonio, San Jacinto, San Gorgonio) it stands out at 11,503 ft.  Southern California isn’t necessarily known for its’ majestic mountains, but these peaks are often used to warm up for longer backcountry trips into the Sierras, especially Mt. Whitney.

It’s always good to check in with the rangers to get the latest on trail conditions.  Also, get an update on the water flows at the creeks and streams.  The office is often staffed with volunteers who are a wealth of knowledge.  Having obtained the backcountry permit several weeks prior at the Mill Creek Ranger station, we arrived at the Momyer Creek Trail parking area  around 0900 on what we expected to be a busy Memorial Day weekend.  Altitude at the trailhead is approx. 5,450 ft.

This was Mary’s first time out with her new Gregory 60 liter pack, complete with a few days worth of food in a bear canister.  While the canisters are not mandatory here, I suggested it to get used to our next backcountry on the JMT where they are required.  She has the BearVault 500, and I picked up the Garcia canister.  Both are highly rated, and I’ve rented the Garcia type in Yosemite.  They are cumbersome and take up a lot of space in the pack, but we just dealt with it.  My wife is an amazing hiking partner.  She really kicks it on the trail and doesn’t complain a bit.

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Now that’s a big girls backpack.

We began our trek by crossing the Mill Creek Wash, which has two sections of the creek that are fairly easy to cross.  The terrain gradually changes from the rocky, sandy wash to a single track laced with chaparral.  We passed through several wooded areas before breaking out into the open.  You want to hit this section of the trail early because it does get hot by midmorning during spring and summer.

The trail begins a gradual climb (around 400-500ft. per mile) with a few switchbacks and moves in and out of deciduous forests.  The acorns from the oak trees are among the largest I’ve ever seen.  Due to the weight of our packs, we would stop every mile or two for a break.

The first water source on Momyer is Alger Creek, about 3.8 miles up.   We climbed to 7,300 ft. before dropping into the canyon at Alger Creek Camp at 7,000 ft.  Prior to the creek, I noticed a brightly colored snake on the switchback below.  Knowing that it wasn’t a rattler and not poisonous, I slowly approached it.  It didn’t budge, so I gently coaxed it with my trekking pole and it slithered away.  Come to find out, it was a California King Snake.  The water flow was decent with several cascades nearby.  We dropped our packs, pulled our lunches out and enjoyed a break at one of the cascades.  Taking our shoes off, we dipped them into the  stream and laughed at how cold it was.  We would also spend some time doing our couples devotion.  It was time well spent.

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We noticed a Boy Scout troop pass by.  We would see them many more times throughout the weekend.   We packed up and began a steep climb out of Alger to the next checkpoint – Dobbs Camp junction.  We passed through an area of many fallen trees and a 500 yd. gauntlet of thorn bushes.  Long pants are advisable through here.

The trail changed from dirt to decomposed granite and became even more narrow as it passed through areas of talus and scree.  We encountered a volunteer trail crew pushing blow-downs off the trail.  The trail crew leader politely asked for our permit and I obliged.  Once he knew we were frequent hikers, he tried to recruit us.  We are thinking about doing some type of volunteer work for the Forest Service, but trail maintenance is tough.  🙂   The one bit of bad news they provided was that the large Boy Scout troop was heading to the camp we were shooting for.  Man, I wasn’t looking forward to camping near a bunch of kids, but knew that we could find another site in the forest.  It was slow going as we passed Dobbs Camp junction but the views of Little San Gorgonio and Mill Creek Canyon were getting better.  Momyer isn’t the most scenic of the trails around here, but is definitely less crowded.

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Alger Creek, a great source of water

We crossed another trickle of a stream before crossing a larger stream near our destination.  It ended up being 300-400 yards before our site.  As we neared Saxton Camp, I saw a clearing in the woods downhill.  We bushwhacked to the area and found a semi-level location.  There were some smaller widow-makers nearby, but the weather forecast was looking good, so it was a risk I was willing to take.   We pitched our tent and set up for the night after hiking 6-7 hours.  It was a long 7 miles today.

Next: Mount San Gorgonio- A Three Day Journey – Day 2: Lost Hiker!


Boondocking and Levitation Photography in the Anza-Borrego Desert

Sunset in the Anza-Borrego Desert

Bloggers have various reasons they write.  For some, it is to share their thoughts.  For others, it is a release or an outlet for the passion that they may have for a particular activity.  Many are amateur photographers and enjoy posting their work.  This episode is dedicated to a recent overnight camping trip to one of my favorite places and a quirky area of photography that is fun.

Anza-Borrego State Park is about 75 miles from my home in North County San Diego.  From late fall to early spring it provides a variety of activities due to the milder weather.   This mid November day found us heading out to an area a few miles east of Borrego Springs to hike and camp.  One of the neat things about this state park is the freedom to move about and explore, including free camping.  Free? In a state park?  Sure, just stay outside the park campground and you can pretty much pitch a tent or park an RV without paying a dime.

The campsite

While researching camping in Anza-Borrego on the Internet, I stumbled on a blog that discussed “boondocking”.  A strange word, the last I heard anything close were the boondockers – black chukka boots that we had in the Navy.  However, boondocking is basically free camping in remote areas or private property – with the owner’s approval.  At times, there is probably a fine line between legal camping and trespassing, but I’ll only go where it is legit.

So a boondocking we went down Rockhouse Canyon Rd. near Clark Dry Lake.  It’s a nice valley located between two mountains – Coyote Mtn to the west and Villager Mtn to the east.   Rockhouse Canyon is a dirt road located approximately 5 miles east of Borrego Springs on SR22.  You can usually see a cluster of RV’s near the highway as most don’t venture too far down the sandy road.  During the week, you can drive a mile or two and find a secluded campsite.     There is one rule in the state park: you must use a metal container for fires.  However, we noticed there is an abundance of homemade fire rings throughout this area.    We pulled in, looked around and noticed the nearest neighbor was almost a 1/2 mile away.  Yes, this will work.

We would stay in the valley and hike north toward Clark Dry Lake on the jeep road.  Overall, the road was in good shape this time of year.  We ended up walking out on the lake bed, passing Coyote Mtn on the left and came up on a quarry.  It was a good opportunity to have fun with some levitation photos.

If you look up levitation photography, you will find some very creative shots of people seemingly flying or floating through the air.  I’m not very good at it, but it is fun to try and will make for a good laugh a few years from now.  The trick is having someone take the pics or to use a remote.  The auto settings on the DSLR usually work, but if the light is low, you may need to play around with the the shutter speed  and ISO to prevent blurring.  Anyhow, this is just another offshoot from being outdoors.  You see, hiking opens up all sorts of possibilities.  Just use common sense and don’t try levitating in front of a busy highway or railroad track. 🙂

Clark Dry Lake

My wife even got into the fun of levitation.

The real visual treat in the desert occurs after the sun sets.  You just have to experience it.  Tonight, it was nearly a new moon and the stars almost outnumbered the grains of sand on the beach.  Next time, I must bring a telescope.

The stars at night, are big and bright, deep in the heart of Anza-Borrego…

In my opinion, a campfire is an absolute necessity for a night in the desert and knocked the edge off the rapidly dropping temps.  The forecast called for 43 degrees, but we came prepared with several layers of clothes and some 3 season sleeping bags.  By the morning, it would drop to 33 degrees.   The animals were most active around sunset and we observed many jackrabbits.  Several desert foxes ventured within 20 ft. of the campsite – curious little creatures with bushy tales.  The coyotes began their yelps and would call out from the east and west.  Once in the tent, the silence of the desert lulled us into a gradual sleep as I dreamt of the Bighorn Sheep jumping over Coyote Mountain.

An Anza-Borrego Desert sunrise.

Huddled in our sleeping bags, the dawn began to faintly illuminate the tent.  I scrambled out and encouraged my wife to come out to see the sunrise.  The air was dry and cold, but the sky was beginning to blossom with various hues of light.  After watching an amazing display, we made our hot chocolate and enjoyed a nice, hot breakfast.  My wife’s first car camping experience turned out very well.  I think that she might try it again.  Hopefully, next time it will be a little warmer at night.  I encourage you to try camping in the desert – it will be a real treat.

Up, up and away.


Why I Hiked the 100 Mile Wilderness

It’s been two months since I completed my northbound hike through the Maine wilderness.  It was one of the hardest things that I have ever done.  It took between 95-100 hrs, almost 12-13 hrs average per day.

Why did I do it?  For me, it was the challenge.  Maybe it is my midlife crisis, but I  needed to prove to myself that I could do something that was physically and mentally difficult.  At times, I wanted to quit but there was no easy way out of the wilderness.  The hardest part for me were the SUDs (Senseless Up-Downs).  But wait, isn’t this the Appalachian Trail?  There are supposed to be mountains.  We would experience over 30,000 ft. of elevation change in one week.  The roots were the next hardest thing.  For some reason, most of them are above the ground in Maine.

We met over 100 Southbound thru hikers (So-Bo’s) who started their hikes at Mt Katahdin.  The wilderness would test their resolve.  Many would take the opportunity to jump off at White’s Landing, spend the night and get a hot meal. Most were Americans, but on our northbound trek, we would meet hikers from Canada, the U.K., Germany, Australia and New Zealand.

As section hikers, we didn’t get into the culture that thru-hikers are immersed in.  Their journeys are for months on end with life on the trail being a totally different experience.  Our goal was to complete the 100 Mile Wilderness in 7 days while enjoying the beautiful Maine backcountry.

For me, the wilderness tested my limits for physical endurance and tolerance of pain.   I learned to work through the frequent muscle aches and ate as much as possible to stretch my endurance.  At times, I would just run out of steam, eat some food and hit the trail again.   We never thought that it would take over 12 hours a day to reach our goal.  We underestimated the terrain and my preparation was inadequate.  While I was probably in the best shape that I’ve been in for at least 10 years, it wasn’t good enough.  My younger friend who is an active duty Marine, admitted that it was tough.   I’m sure he could have finished a day earlier, but in hiking you are only as fast as your slowest member.  Mentally, it was a daily challenge to keep taking the next step.   At this point, I’m not driven to hike the entire Appalachian Trail.  The time, dedication and fortitude to do this for months on end takes a special person.

I learned a few things about myself.

– When presented with a difficult situation, I was able to persevere and complete the task.

– Pain is somewhat relative.  Unless you are dealing with an obvious injury, it is mind over matter.

– My determination overrode my perceived limits.

– As a believer, I prayed for the ability to endure.  It was answered with endurance.

– Living a week with only what I could carry  on my back helped me to re-examine my desire for “stuff”  I have too much stuff.

Getting “off the grid” to escape the rat race is really quite the privilege.  Of course, most of us have to return to a job, but it sure clears the mind and provides the opportunity to see the amazing creation.  In the end, my trek through the 100 Mile Wilderness confirmed why I am drawn to the backcountry.  It can bring out the best in you,  is therapeutic and can provide focus to the things that are really important in life.