Adventures in hiking…

Backcountry Tips and Lessons Learned

DSC_0463 Take it from this novice, if there are mistakes to be made in the backcountry, I will make them.  Here are a some of the most obvious, take em’ or leave em’ but consider how the simplest oversight will change your backcountry experience.

– Not using a checklist.  Oops, not enough toilet paper.   (Leaves are single-ply though)

– Check available water sources ahead of time:  Ranger station – Oh, sorry they’ve been furloughed! ,  online blogs.

– Check trail conditions at ranger station – Don’t forget the permit.  You can be a renegade and stealth camp.  That just sounds like fun.

– Bring a water filter or purification tablets.  Results from failure to do so will take 7-10 days.

– Take the proper clothing.  Cotton is almost always a no-no as it retains moisture.

– Bring a backpack cover or large trash bag for rain.

–  Enough food and a 1-2 day backup supply

– pre-cooked bacon is like manna

bear

Leave food in your backpack and this may happen to you.

– Bringing too much stuff – Setting your tent up on uneven ground or in a drainage area

– Not using a footprint under your tent and finding out there were sharp rocks there.

– Camping far from a water source

– Not bringing a mosquito net or bug repellant

– Not having adequate land navigation skills or maps makes for a longer hike

DSC06914

I came too close to this critter.

– Not having important spares like flashlights or matches

– Wearing shoes that fit just right and then finding out your feet swell another size and a half.

– Everyone smells bad after a few days in the backcountry

– Bees like Dr. Bronner’s lavender soap. Alot.

IMG_1514

Don’t pass up an opportunity to cool those jets. It’s the little things…

– Learned how important sock liners are.  They cut down on moisture and abrasion.

– Permethrin sprayed on your clothing ahead of time repels bugs.  This stuff works very well: Sawyer Products Premium Permethrin Clothing Insect Repellent Trigger Spray, 24-Ounce

– Long sleeves, convertible pants and a headnet work better. Columbia Men’s Bahama II Long Sleeve Shirt

– Dr. Bronner’s peppermint soap makes you feel all tingly.   Be careful where you use it.
DSC_0089 – Hiking in dark clothes in southern California is like wearing a solar panel.

– Light-colored clothing makes it easier to see the ticks.

– Leave the perfume and cologne at home and off of your skin.  Unless you want to attract bees, bears and moose’s in mating season.

– Take extra batteries.  Lithium ones last the longest but are expensive

– Learn the international rescue signals in case you need to signal the rescuer.  It would be bad if you needed help and gave the ok signal.

DSC06567

This will lift your spirits.

–  Hiking poles save the knees These are highly rated: Pair of Pace Maker Flip Lock “Expedition” Trekking Poles with Vulcanized Rubber Feet and Attachments

–  Rattlesnakes can blend in with the leaves.  Use hiking poles, chances are a rattler may strike the pole instead of your leg.

– Slow down, stop and take it all in.  You’ll be surprised what you can see and hear.

– Most wildlife doesn’t want anything to do with silly humans.

– I’m a tick magnet.  (not chick)

– I don’t fear most bugs, except ticks.

– Ticks almost always end up near the groin.

– Always let someone know where you are hiking, and for how long.

– Consider getting an emergency beacon or GPS locator, especially if you do a bit of solo hiking.  Read my blog “Bitten by a Rattler on the Pacific Crest Trail”

– If you have pets at home, especially cats – check your pack before you leave.  They like to leave presents or hide inside things.

DSC_0725

Slow down and you’ll be amazed at what you see.

– Bear canisters can be hard to open when its cold or wet.  Try opening one ahead of time for practice.  When camping, turn them on the side to keep rain-water out.

– While in the backcountry, if you pack it in, you should always pack it out.  Except for poop and used toilet paper, that’s where I draw the line.  If you hike Mt. Whitney, take care of your “business” ahead of time or you must use the wag bag.  Yuck.

– Campfires are great for morale.  Sadly, many areas out west in the backcountry prohibit them due to the risk of wildfires.

Bottom line,  life’s lessons are better learned from others’ mistakes.

3 responses

  1. Fun post. I laughed….but I also learned a couple of things.

    October 10, 2013 at 8:37 pm

  2. Rachel Ramsland

    I love Dr. Bronner’s peppermint soap and how tingly it makes me feel! 🙂 haha but I laughed at your comment about the lavender soap!

    October 10, 2013 at 9:06 pm

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