Adventures in hiking…

San Gabriel Mountains – Icehouse Canyon via Chapman Trail

IMG_1440

U.S.D.A. Identifier: Icehouse Canyon

Type of trail: As hiked – a modified loop

Distance as hiked: 7.5 miles

Approximate elevation: Trailhead-5,400 ft., Top of trail-7,234 ft.

Temps: 75-85 degrees

Difficulty: moderate

Trail Composition: dirt, rock, scree

Fees:  Day use fee  or Adventure Pass

Due to recent fire in San Jacinto area, we ventured back to the Mt. Baldy area.  We haven’t been there since last summer and there are tons of trails to explore.  Today, we picked Icehouse Canyon.  My blogging buddy “Hiking Angeles Forest” knows this area well and has written extensively on the San Gabriels.

Be sure to pick up your permit at the Visitor Center in Baldy Village.  The volunteer on duty was friendly and we were on our way in minutes.  The trailhead is approximately 1.5 miles up the road with a well marked sign on the right.  The parking lot for the trail is large, mainly because this is a busy trail.  Too busy for my liking, but it is a summer weekend and there is water near the trail.

The path is well marked as you navigate your way around boulders.  Going up, a canyon wall is on the left and there are old cabins along the trail next to a creek.  This creek appears to run year-round with several nice cascades.  We would take the Chapman Trail on the left around the one mile mark.  Most of the people were continuing on Icehouse Canyon.  Actually most of the lowlanders were hanging around the creek.  The Chapman trail was less crowded and provided decent solitude – even for a Saturday afternoon.

IMG_1438

We stopped for lunch at Cedar Glen Camp, a relatively flat area with – you guessed it – cedars.   It was a bit buggy for this late July day, the gnats were annoying, but at least they weren’t mosquitos.  After lunch, we began a gradual climb, emerged from the woods and entered an area of chaparral.  You could see where parts of the area burned and the new growth appeared to be between 7-10 years old.

IMG_1426

The trail broke out as we hiked through talus and slides.  We trekked along a cliff with drop offs that were 500 ft. or more.  If you are afraid of heights, this is not the trail for you.  Heck, if you are afraid of heights, you probably shouldn’t be hiking.  It was exciting and the views to the west were great.

IMG_1434

Hitting the junction to Icehouse Canyon Saddle, we took a right and began a quick descent.  I can imagine that this would be a fun climb in the winter and envisioned what it was like to snowshoe up here.  Haven’t done that yet, but we are planning to try out some snowshoe day hikes this winter.  The Chapman trail would actually be sketchy in the winter unless you had some crampons and an ice axe.

The path from the Chapman Trail junction down would wind its’ way along a mostly dry creek and would criss-cross the canyon several times.   We were keeping our eye on a helicopter that was flying circles about 3-4 miles to our west toward Mt. Baldy.  Soon, we saw smoke near the helicopter’s path.  We picked up the pace a bit just in case.  We still had two miles to go.   I took the opportunity to discuss how we would handle a fire if it breached the hill.  Canyons are not the best place to be in a fire as they tend to concentrate the flames.  I pointed out areas of scree and talus on the slopes to the east where there was less fuel.  Not ideal, but our choices would be limited.   We could also soak our neckerchiefs with water and place them over our mouths/noses if needed.

After 20-30 minutes, the smoke diminished so whatever it was appeared to be under control.  Hike with us and you are assured to have an adventure.  Nearing the trailhead, we laughed at the sign warning the fishermen.

IMG_1442

All in all, Icehouse Canyon – Chapman Trail is a nice hike.  Best done during the week or late on the weekend.  It was good to review some wilderness skills like wildfire procedures.  I’ve learned so much by reading other blogs and resources on the Internet.  If you are old fashioned like me and enjoy the feel of a book, then The Backpacker’s Field Manual, Revised and Updated: A Comprehensive Guide to Mastering Backcountry Skills by Rick Curtis is an excellent resource.  Enjoy your hike friends, and take someone with you to enjoy the beauty of this great land.

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s