Adventures in hiking…

John Muir Trail Section Hike – Day 1 – Devils Postpile to Rosalie Lake

DSC_0008

Link to YouTube slideshow:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfTmobpnlmg

If you’ve ever camped near rushing water you may understand that it’s like taking a sleeping pill.   In the Sierras near Mammoth, the San Joaquin River is small as rivers go, but grows as it makes its way west.   It is born at Thousand Island Lake where we would camp on day 2.   As the San Joaquin descends into Devils Postpile, the cascades provide some character to the little river branch before it provides vital nourishment to the California Central Valley.

DSC_0021

We were awakened by the dawn light as it filtered through the trees in the campground.  Breakfast would be scrambled eggs and bacon.  Food is a priority for me in the backcountry.  I found out about these crystallized eggs and pre-cooked bacon from Backpackers magazine.  The eggs are real, in powdered form and when mixed with water – come to life when heat is applied.  These aren’t the old-school powdered eggs, they are the real deal.   The bacon is real and just reheated.  Put two checks in the protein box for today.   Only thing missing was toast, but that’s ok.  We would have to get our carbs from the pita bread and snack bars.

We packed up our site and headed toward the Devils Postpile Monument less than a half mile up the trail.  Afterward, we would hit the JMT and head north.  We would be one of the odd 10% of JMT hikers that go north.  It just worked out that way mainly for logistics.   Devils Postpile is an amazing display of a geologic formation of lava that cooled in long geometric columns.  Definitely worth a side visit.  We would run into a family that was hiking the JMT from north to south and they proceeded to tell us about the onslaught of mosquitos.  A couple of the younger women had 50 or 60 bites – on their arms.  Hmmm, either bug repellant wasn’t applied, or these are mosquitos from Hades.  They also told us how a bear tore into their non-food bags that were hanging from trees in Lyell Canyon.   I wasn’t fazed by these tales of woe, thanked them for the info and looked forward to meeting the challenge (and our dementors) head on.

DSC_0041

We made our way up the hill several hundred yards before I realized we were going south.  Oops, the morning sun was on my left – that’s not right.  I flipped my map around, apologized and asked everyone if they were warmed up yet.  I felt like Dr Lazarus in the movie Galaxy Quest, when he was reading his tricorder thingy backwards.    We found the JMT junction and crossed the San Joaquin on a nice footbridge.  My brother and I brought our DSLR cameras on this trip, the extra 2 pounds worth it since we knew about the vistas that lay ahead.  The trail wasted no time increasing elevation as we left the river and the mid-morning heat was on.  We peeled off a layer and unzipped the legs off our pants.  A bit of sunscreen and bug repellant and we were on our way.  Much of this area was devastated by a freak windstorm last year and required much trail maintenance to clear the blow-downs.   I was impressed at the amount of work done to restore the trail.  Kudos to the Forest Service employees and their army of volunteers.

Our packs were heavy with our full complement of food.  We would carry 2 liters of water and a spare .75 liter bottle.  Prior to hitting the trail, we would tank up – drinking as much as was comfortable.  Hydration is everything when you hike, especially when your body is working hard at altitude with a heavy load.   Pulling my Tom Harrison map out, I would occasionally check our position and compare the various landmarks.  Eventually, the JMT and PCT split and we would go left to follow the JMT toward a land of lakes.

DSC_0051

The trail was fairly steep at 400-500 ft per mile and came with an array of SUDS (senseless up-downs).  In a hikers’ mind, you should go up or down, not both.   We could hear the cascades of the river below and see waterfalls in the distance.   We cinched the shoulder harnesses and load balancers to bring the packs closer to our shoulders as the incline seemed relentless.   With a full pack, comfort is not really an option.  You shift the load from hips to shoulders and move the pain points around.  General rule is uphill-bring the load in close to your shoulders, downhill-shift it to your hips.  Always a good idea to play around with waist-shoulder-sternum-load balancer straps as you hike.  All good quality backpacks have those adjustments.  It takes practice to adjust those while holding hiking poles, sipping water and keeping your eye on the trail.

As the GPS altimeter continued to click up, I glanced again at the maps.  The Harrison maps have great detail, but man it was hard to make out those contour lines.  As we approached 10,000 ft later in the day, we realized that we should look for a camp near a water source.  That wouldn’t be too hard since there was water everywhere.  I knew enough to avoid ponds since their still waters are just breeding grounds for mosquitoes.  I had cut out select pages of the John Muir Trail: The essential guide to hiking America’s most famous trail, which listed elevation profiles and campsite coördinates along the JMT.  It is an invaluable guide and highly recommended.

The guide recommended an area near the Rosalie Lake outlet and it was spot on.  There was evidence of a previous camp close by a stream.  Too bad we couldn’t make use of the fire ring since there is a moratorium on campfires in the Inyo National Forest.

DSC_0062

The campsite was full of those big black carpenter ants.  They are pretty harmless from what I remember unless you get close to their colony.  They are persistent and get into everything that isn’t sealed up.  We learned to co-exist with these critters.  One thing, you can’t be afraid of bugs in the backcountry.  In the Sierras, most are harmless and bug repellant with 33% Deet works ok.  Be careful with the 100% Deet, it melts most plastics.  Another thing worth mentioning is that prior to our trip I sprayed our outer garments with Permethrin.  I’ve used this on the A.T. and it works great as most bugs will bounce off your clothes-especially ticks.  It also is effective for up to six washings.  It can be applied to your tent or tarp too.

Dinner was a Mountain Home Chicken & Mashed Potatoes.  It’s a good one, four stars.  We would wind down our day chatting about how hard the first day was.  I told everyone how well they did on the trail and that it would eventually get easier.  It didn’t get easier until the last day…

The mosquitos were definitely in charge here, but our headnets and long sleeves/pants kept them at bay.  As the night cooled and the breeze picked up, their numbers diminished.  The heat of the day was gone and the coolness of Rosalie Lake wafted over our campsite.  Temps would drop into the low 50’s at 9,500 ft.  The lake outlet was a babbling brook which made it so easy to sleep.  If at all possible, seek out those streams, they are nature’s sleep machine.

Late at night, we would see flashes of light through our tent.  Why do strange things happen late at night?  I was concerned about a forest fire, so I unzipped the tent to watch the sky.  To the south – southeast, it appeared to be fireworks.  It was only June 30th, but some town must have gotten an early start.  Maybe there was something going on in Mammoth Lakes.

DSC_0093

Gear we recommend:

shoes/boots –Five Ten Men’s Camp Four Hiking Shoe

hiking pants – Columbia Men’s Silver Ridge Cargo Short

I use a Nikon 3000 series camera and have really been pleased with it.  It is easy to use and takes awesome pictures.  It’s durable and has survived many hiking and camping trips.  Nikon D3200 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-200mm Non-VR DX Zoom Lenses Bundle

3 responses

  1. sweetnlowe

    Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 21:51:38 +0000 To: sarahelaine225@hotmail.com

    July 15, 2013 at 9:37 am

    • Wow, love the pictures. I have to agree l love the hnaxgoeal stone, l never thought that it would lay bare like that on the top. I always figured it would be covered by dirt. Instead it looks like a patio was laid out by God!

      August 22, 2013 at 3:49 am

    • Reminds me of Slide Rock State Park, which when visiting in the semmur some years ago, my kids had a great time (with too many others) coursing down the natural slides. I like the snow effect. Great pictures.

      October 18, 2013 at 12:55 pm

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s