Adventures in hiking…

Mount San Gorgonio – A Three Day Journey – Day 1

Plummers Meadow

Plummer’s Meadow, Momyer Creek Trail

As part of our workup to a section hike of the John Muir Trail this summer, Mary and I decided to do a 3 day practice hike to the summit of Mt San Gorgonio via the Momyer Creek Trail.   The tallest of the Three Sisters (San Antonio, San Jacinto, San Gorgonio) it stands out at 11,503 ft.  Southern California isn’t necessarily known for its’ majestic mountains, but these peaks are often used to warm up for longer backcountry trips into the Sierras, especially Mt. Whitney.

It’s always good to check in with the rangers to get the latest on trail conditions.  Also, get an update on the water flows at the creeks and streams.  The office is often staffed with volunteers who are a wealth of knowledge.  Having obtained the backcountry permit several weeks prior at the Mill Creek Ranger station, we arrived at the Momyer Creek Trail parking area  around 0900 on what we expected to be a busy Memorial Day weekend.  Altitude at the trailhead is approx. 5,450 ft.

This was Mary’s first time out with her new Gregory 60 liter pack, complete with a few days worth of food in a bear canister.  While the canisters are not mandatory here, I suggested it to get used to our next backcountry on the JMT where they are required.  She has the BearVault 500, and I picked up the Garcia canister.  Both are highly rated, and I’ve rented the Garcia type in Yosemite.  They are cumbersome and take up a lot of space in the pack, but we just dealt with it.  My wife is an amazing hiking partner.  She really kicks it on the trail and doesn’t complain a bit.

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Now that’s a big girls backpack.

We began our trek by crossing the Mill Creek Wash, which has two sections of the creek that are fairly easy to cross.  The terrain gradually changes from the rocky, sandy wash to a single track laced with chaparral.  We passed through several wooded areas before breaking out into the open.  You want to hit this section of the trail early because it does get hot by midmorning during spring and summer.

The trail begins a gradual climb (around 400-500ft. per mile) with a few switchbacks and moves in and out of deciduous forests.  The acorns from the oak trees are among the largest I’ve ever seen.  Due to the weight of our packs, we would stop every mile or two for a break.

The first water source on Momyer is Alger Creek, about 3.8 miles up.   We climbed to 7,300 ft. before dropping into the canyon at Alger Creek Camp at 7,000 ft.  Prior to the creek, I noticed a brightly colored snake on the switchback below.  Knowing that it wasn’t a rattler and not poisonous, I slowly approached it.  It didn’t budge, so I gently coaxed it with my trekking pole and it slithered away.  Come to find out, it was a California King Snake.  The water flow was decent with several cascades nearby.  We dropped our packs, pulled our lunches out and enjoyed a break at one of the cascades.  Taking our shoes off, we dipped them into the  stream and laughed at how cold it was.  We would also spend some time doing our couples devotion.  It was time well spent.

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We noticed a Boy Scout troop pass by.  We would see them many more times throughout the weekend.   We packed up and began a steep climb out of Alger to the next checkpoint – Dobbs Camp junction.  We passed through an area of many fallen trees and a 500 yd. gauntlet of thorn bushes.  Long pants are advisable through here.

The trail changed from dirt to decomposed granite and became even more narrow as it passed through areas of talus and scree.  We encountered a volunteer trail crew pushing blow-downs off the trail.  The trail crew leader politely asked for our permit and I obliged.  Once he knew we were frequent hikers, he tried to recruit us.  We are thinking about doing some type of volunteer work for the Forest Service, but trail maintenance is tough.  🙂   The one bit of bad news they provided was that the large Boy Scout troop was heading to the camp we were shooting for.  Man, I wasn’t looking forward to camping near a bunch of kids, but knew that we could find another site in the forest.  It was slow going as we passed Dobbs Camp junction but the views of Little San Gorgonio and Mill Creek Canyon were getting better.  Momyer isn’t the most scenic of the trails around here, but is definitely less crowded.

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Alger Creek, a great source of water

We crossed another trickle of a stream before crossing a larger stream near our destination.  It ended up being 300-400 yards before our site.  As we neared Saxton Camp, I saw a clearing in the woods downhill.  We bushwhacked to the area and found a semi-level location.  There were some smaller widow-makers nearby, but the weather forecast was looking good, so it was a risk I was willing to take.   We pitched our tent and set up for the night after hiking 6-7 hours.  It was a long 7 miles today.

Next: Mount San Gorgonio- A Three Day Journey – Day 2: Lost Hiker!

One response

  1. Pretty! This has been an incredibly wonderful post.
    Thanks for supplying these details.

    August 2, 2014 at 4:33 am

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