Adventures in hiking…

Anza Borrego – Calcite Mine and a Slot Canyon

Rock Formation - Calcite Mine

A desert landscape is one of the most beautiful sights that one will ever see.  The openness and feeling of adventure while backpacking the vast Colorado Desert  can be an amazing experience.  Wait a minute, Colorado Desert?  I thought you were talking about Anza-Borrego!  Actually, the Colorado Desert is part of the larger Sonoran Desert – over 7 million acres with some of the most unique plant and animal life ever.  Anza-Borrego is the name given to the state park that encompasses 3 California counties and is the second largest state park in the U.S.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_Desert, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anza-Borrego_Desert_State_Park)

In our opinion, the best time to hike here is during wildflower blooms in the spring.  However,  a winter day hike provides mild temps and relatively stable weather.  Winter is the rainy season is southern California, so you have to keep an eye out on the forecast to avoid dangerous flash flood conditions.   If you ever have the opportunity to hike near the palm oasis at the state park headquarters, you will see the results of a previous flash flood.  Palms over 4 feet wide were uprooted and washed away, boulders the size of cars were rolled around and thoughts of the great flood mentioned in the book of Genesis came to mind.

On this day, we would venture out approximately 20 miles east of the town of Borrego Springs on SR-22 to hike the Calcite Mine Trail.  We parked on the north side of SR-22  and walked to the trailhead that was about 100 yds. away.  You can actually park most vehicles in a dirt area by the trailhead.  At times, a popular area for jeeps and dirtbikes, the road up to the old mine is a challenge for a good driver in an off-road vehicle.  We would only see one vehicle coming down from the mine.

calcite mine trail - looking into anza borrego

The landscape here was so different from the area around Coyote Mountain to the west; that’s one of the things that we love about this desert.  The sandstone cliffs appear to be carved out of the ground by a majestic artist.  As the sun shifts and passes in and out of the clouds, the colors constantly change.  The contrast of the land with the sky and Salton Sea to the east present a palette for the amateur artist.

The Calcite Mine Trail, is an approximate 4 miles round trip.  It is an easy-moderate hike up the jeep trail and the elevation gain is around 500 ft.  Not much shade here, so hope for a cloudy day, bring lots of water, sunscreen and a nice hat.  As we made our way up the rocky road/trail, we scrambled up the side to peer down into one of many slot canyons.  Oh yeah, we just gotta check that out on the way down!

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If you’re thinking that the calcite mine is intact, you will be disappointed.  Filled in long ago, there are barely traces that it even existed.  There are shards and chunks of calcite, but like most other parks it is illegal to collect souvenirs.  An interesting mineral, it was actually used in Norden bombsight manufactured during WWII.  It’s quite possible that the bombsight used on the Enola Gay had calcite from this mine.  We would have lunch near the old mine marker, on a sandstone outcropping.  As is our new tradition, we would have hot tea.

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Having fun on the sandstone cliffs.

We enjoyed the solitude and the panoramic views from our lunch spot and began our way down to the slot canyon.  It was exciting to enter the canyon as the sandstone walls rose to over 75 ft.  Mary mentioned that this was not a good place to be during an earthquake.  Within a week of hiking this canyon, a 4.5 quake would hit near Anza, about 15-20 miles from here.  I checked the skies for signs of rain.  A storm to our north could bring flash floods that would make our fate like the dinosaurs of old.

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Mary really enjoyed navigating the narrow canyon.

We made our way down, the walls closing in and the path as little as several inches wide.  It was fun and one of the most unique experiences to date.  We would stop to examine the cliffs and formations carved from repeated water flows.  Sometimes, we would have to jump 5 feet or so to the next level.

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I was trying not to get my foot stuck. The slot canyons are not for the claustrophobic.

Eventually, we emerged from the slot canyon into Palm Wash, one of many that had its’ own ecosystem.  Other than birds, we would see mostly insects, beetles and huge colonies of ants.  One ant colony was carrying the blossoms from an adjacent bush to their queen.   Even in this sparse land, God sees fit for his creatures to survive.  We would encounter a few motorcyclists on their way back from exploring the nearby trails.

Slot Canyon - Calcite Mine Trail

This slot canyon opens up into a wash that goes on for miles.

As often is the case, I missed the turnoff if there even was one.  My GPS indicated that we were diverging from our original track to the mine.  A nearby cell tower was a good reference that indicated we were east of our goal.  We cut over a hill and headed west as the sun rapidly sank low in the horizon.  We were pushing 10 miles at this point, but the waypoint on my GPS indicated we were getting closer.  In my rush this morning, I didn’t print out a local map.  Duhh!   We were ok though, on day hikes, we tend to carry more than we need and are usually prepared in case we have to spend a night out.

The walkabout ended uneventfully and we chalked up another successful day in the wilderness.  I encourage you to get out my friends – regardless of where you live.  There is so much to see….

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