Adventures in hiking…

Why I Hiked the 100 Mile Wilderness

It’s been two months since I completed my northbound hike through the Maine wilderness.  It was one of the hardest things that I have ever done.  It took between 95-100 hrs, almost 12-13 hrs average per day.

Why did I do it?  For me, it was the challenge.  Maybe it is my midlife crisis, but I  needed to prove to myself that I could do something that was physically and mentally difficult.  At times, I wanted to quit but there was no easy way out of the wilderness.  The hardest part for me were the SUDs (Senseless Up-Downs).  But wait, isn’t this the Appalachian Trail?  There are supposed to be mountains.  We would experience over 30,000 ft. of elevation change in one week.  The roots were the next hardest thing.  For some reason, most of them are above the ground in Maine.

We met over 100 Southbound thru hikers (So-Bo’s) who started their hikes at Mt Katahdin.  The wilderness would test their resolve.  Many would take the opportunity to jump off at White’s Landing, spend the night and get a hot meal. Most were Americans, but on our northbound trek, we would meet hikers from Canada, the U.K., Germany, Australia and New Zealand.

As section hikers, we didn’t get into the culture that thru-hikers are immersed in.  Their journeys are for months on end with life on the trail being a totally different experience.  Our goal was to complete the 100 Mile Wilderness in 7 days while enjoying the beautiful Maine backcountry.

For me, the wilderness tested my limits for physical endurance and tolerance of pain.   I learned to work through the frequent muscle aches and ate as much as possible to stretch my endurance.  At times, I would just run out of steam, eat some food and hit the trail again.   We never thought that it would take over 12 hours a day to reach our goal.  We underestimated the terrain and my preparation was inadequate.  While I was probably in the best shape that I’ve been in for at least 10 years, it wasn’t good enough.  My younger friend who is an active duty Marine, admitted that it was tough.   I’m sure he could have finished a day earlier, but in hiking you are only as fast as your slowest member.  Mentally, it was a daily challenge to keep taking the next step.   At this point, I’m not driven to hike the entire Appalachian Trail.  The time, dedication and fortitude to do this for months on end takes a special person.

I learned a few things about myself.

– When presented with a difficult situation, I was able to persevere and complete the task.

– Pain is somewhat relative.  Unless you are dealing with an obvious injury, it is mind over matter.

– My determination overrode my perceived limits.

– As a believer, I prayed for the ability to endure.  It was answered with endurance.

– Living a week with only what I could carry  on my back helped me to re-examine my desire for “stuff”  I have too much stuff.

Getting “off the grid” to escape the rat race is really quite the privilege.  Of course, most of us have to return to a job, but it sure clears the mind and provides the opportunity to see the amazing creation.  In the end, my trek through the 100 Mile Wilderness confirmed why I am drawn to the backcountry.  It can bring out the best in you,  is therapeutic and can provide focus to the things that are really important in life.

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