Adventures in hiking…

Off The Beaten Path (in Southern California)

A Southern California sunrise

I admit to being a bit of an introvert.  Maybe that is why hiking in the backcountry is so enjoyable to me.  The solitude and peacefulness that one can experience is guaranteed to lower your blood pressure by ten points.  Admit it, you don’t really enjoy crowds.  With over 22 million people in Southern California, the thought of having a space pretty much to my wife and me is ok.    If you make it to the backcountry, you will see what it’s all about. After a few hours are spent on the trail, you may notice certain sounds that are missing.  You don’t hear cars, sirens, doors slamming and people talking loudly. You hear the wind blowing through the trees.  You hear the woodpeckers, hawks, chipmunks and quail.  The sounds of nature envelope you.  You hear your footsteps as you walk, the clicking of the hiking poles on the granite.   You see blue, open sky.   The contrast between the terrain and horizon, especially at sunset is amazing.  At night, the heavens reveal as many stars as the descendants of Abraham.  The moon is so much brighter.  The air seems much more crisp and cleaner.

The “blue hour”. Sunrise on the Socal Peninsular Range.

If you are a believer, you may recognize that your surroundings in the wilderness are not just happenstance.  I think the beauty was created by a God that loves us and provided this for our enjoyment.

Wildlife (Southern Cali)

Admittedly, in SoCal there aren’t many large animal encounters on the trail.  Hikers typically aren’t  stealthy because we actually want the large animals to hear us coming.  Startling a bear or cougar is probably not a good idea.  In our experience, we have come across more deer than anything else.  I’ve found that the earlier (or later) you go in the day, the chances of viewing the critters are better.  On the trail, it’s mostly birds, reptiles and small mammals. In the spring and summer, the rattlers are out and it’s not uncommon to run across a few.

A Red Tail Hawk on the hunt

I love to take pics on the trail; it’s a way to share my experience with others.  Up until last year, I used a point and click camera.  It was ok for landscapes, but not for wildlife.  After getting a DSLR, my desire to take better photos increased.    Now photography is another part of my hiking experience.  I still don’t know much about it, but found if you take enough pics, some will turn out just fine.  Just get the basics down like composition and lighting.

Most of the hiking that I do with my wife are day hikes.  We tend to walk an average of 7-10 miles and try to include some decent elevation changes.    We stay on the trail, but there are often side trips to check out the scenery or just to explore.  Sometimes, we lose the path and bushwhack for a bit.  For me, the experience of hiking is better enjoyed when you can share it with someone.  My wife of over 30 years is a great partner on the trail.  While we’ve had some close calls, lots of tumbles and have been a little lost, she trusts that I will get her back to the car eventually.  Our time on the trail has forged a special bond within our marriage.  Now, if I can just get her out on a multi-day backcountry trip. ….  For now, I’ll just have to do that with the guys.

A SoCal sunset

I tend to bring more stuff (proportionally) on a day hike than on a backcountry trip.  Plenty of water, 1st aid kit, survival, GPS, maps, extra snacks and clothing.  Sometimes the temperature varies 25-30 deg. on a day hike.  We’ve hiked when it was as cold as 18 in Yosemite and as high as 98 in the Borrego Desert.  In our experience, hiking in the cold was more comfortable.  The heat just saps your energy.

Occasionally, I will hike solo and always let family members know my destination.  A text to a family member or friend is invaluable.  This year, I purchased a SPOT Messenger, a GPS locator that can send my location to friends, family members.  It also functions as an emergency beacon if needed.   While I don’t take risks while hiking solo, it provides some peace of mind.  I used it on a hike this past summer on the Maine 100 Mile Wilderness (part of the Appalachian Trail) and our family members could track us on a daily basis.  Even a couple of my coworkers followed our trip as it plots your location on Google Maps.

On Mt. Baldy

I’ve learned  and experienced many things on the trail.  After 3 years of hiking, mostly in California, I’m still quite the novice.  I’ve learned to be aware of my surroundings,  and have not taken a serious tumble yet.  Oh, I’ve fallen in streams and came within a couple of feet of a coiled Pacific Rattler, but am convinced that I must have a guardian angel with me.

Most trails that we hike are not easy, that would be boring.  Do the research, find some with hills and varied terrain.  I’ve sought out guidebooks for my area like:  60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Diego: Including North, South and East Counties  and  Afoot and Afield: San Diego County: A Comprehensive Hiking Guide    Seek the obscure trails and you may be rewarded with killer views of sunsets or lush alpine meadows.  Find the websites that lists the hikes.  They don’t always turn out as advertised.  On a couple of occasions, we’ve had to turn back due to overgrown brush.  Oh, and if you tend venture off trail,  take a trail map-they are invaluable.  You can’t worry about bugs out here-ticks,  arachnids and once a tarantula.  No scorpions yet, thank goodness.

The bottom line is just get out my friends.   This doesn’t only apply in SoCal, there are trails all over this great country.  I guarantee after you spend a few Saturdays off the beaten path, you will be hooked.

I now use a Nikon 3300 series DSLR, a great camera for the trail: Nikon D3300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR with AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Zoom Lens (Black)

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