Adventures in hiking…

Appalachian Trail – 100 Mile Wilderness – Day 7

Nahmakanta Lake between Wadleigh Stream Lean-To and Nesuntabunt Mtn.

At the Wadleigh Stream Lean-To.  As dawn broke the next morning, we were still in our sleeping bags and heard footsteps outside the tent on several occasions.  By the time we rolled out, most of the lean to occupants were gone.  Then we realized that we had placed our tent on the path between the shelter and the brook.  Oh well, it seemed like a good spot last night.    Getting our usual late start, we filtered a few liters from the brook and were on the trail at a decent pace.  Climbing Nesuntabut Mtn,  we would reach a false summit which had some amazing views of Katahdin.  We met a young So-Bo thru-hiker  who was taking a break and taking a smoke.   Later, I would laugh to myself about this young smoker.  Such a dichotomy, long distance hiking and smoking.  I wondered if part of his journey was trying to quit.  Hmmm.  Twenty minutes later we ran into a mother and daughter taking a break on an outcropping.  The mom shared their story of hiking up Katahdin with the intent on hiking the 100 Mile Wilderness southbound.   After 15 miles, the wilderness had taken its’ toll on the mom.  Her legs must have had scratches over every inch.  She said that they were going to bail out at White’s Landing, another 20 miles to the south.  That was a good thing, because the trail definitely gets harder the farther south you go.  Yep, this trail was not for the fainthearted.   We wished them well and made the final 300 ft. to the summit.

The last few hundred feet of Nesuntabunt Mtn summit.

We would skirt Pollywog Stream and eventually, we would parallel Rainbow Stream to began a gradual climb into the forest.  The humidity was high, and I think we were losing more water than we could take in.  We would end up drinking about 5 liters of water today.

Rainbow Stream at times was a rushing torrent through narrow crevices and multiple cascades.  It was one of the fastest flowing streams of the entire trip.  Taking a break, we observed several young people frolicking downstream.  Tempting, but we owed the taskmaster about 5 more miles today.  After  a while, I found myself daydreaming and ended up in a meadow.   I noticed a hiker setting up his tent and saw the Rainbow Stream Lean-To below.  There were several northbound section hikers who were trying to make Rainbow Springs Campground a few miles away.  Thunderstorms were all around us, but other than a few sprinkles, no rain.  A Southbounder warned us about the bogs ahead.  Lovely, more bogs.  Actually, it could have been much worse – if it had been raining, we would have been sloshing through the bogs instead of hopping from rock to rock and root to root.

We took a break and dipped our feet in the stream.  Trying to keep my feet out of the dirt, I almost fell in.  This became a busy lean-to as a couple of more So-Bo’s would stop in.  It was around 4 p.m. and most hikers would be settling in for the day.  Not us, we still had a good 4 or 5 hours to go.  A bridge, made up of several logs made for a precarious crossing.  The thunder would continue, and we actually hoped for some rain.  Lightning struck within a mile or so, the crack was sharp and loud.  I imagined there was one less tree in the forest.  As we made our way around the various lakes and ponds, the trail would be within yards of the bank.  Mostly boggy at this point, it would slow our progress.  The gnats and mosquitoes were relentless, but we pressed on.

I forgot to mention on Day 6 that Joe stumbled upon the remnants of another hiker’s expensive carbon fiber trekking pole, half buried in a mud bog.  Joe would go on to explain that he almost ended up doing the splits into the same muddy crossing.  My $25 poles were holding up just fine and kept me from falling down dozens of times.  I will never hike without poles again.

We would stop at Rainbow Springs Campground and it started raining lightly.  Joe broke out his rainfly and we ate under it.  When I went down to the lake to refill our water, I saw a pipe sticking out from the ground with water draining into the lake.  I thought that it was odd and put my hand under the water flow.  It was ice-cold.  Man, this was the first spring we stumbled on and the water was the best of the entire trip.  We dumped some of our old water out and filled up with this heavenly liquid.  It was so humid out here and the water so cold that condensation built up on our water containers.

The campground area was noisy with the sound of hikers enjoying themselves.  We still needed to log a few more miles to make it out by mid-morning, so we packed up and headed north.   The light began to fade on our last night in the wilderness.  As darkness fell, our eyes would slowly get used to the low light and were able to hike without headlamps for quite a while after sunset.  Joe would begin his search for a primo campsite in the blackness of the Appalachian  Trail.

We would find an established site on the shore of Rainbow Lake.  It was tough to find a spot large enough without roots or rocks, but that’s what the pads were for.   The mice would scurry around the campsite and the loons would croon us to sleep in a humid, windless night.  I was excited and yet sad that this would be our last night on the A.T.  We would be rudely awaked around 0300 when the haunting calls of the loons turned into the mating call of the loons.  It was not a soothing sound.  But today would bring cheeseburgers…..

My gear: Deuter ACT Lite 65+10 Backpack – Emerald/Anthracite  A lightweight pack that is super-tough.  A waterproof cover can be purchased separately.

One response

  1. writer77

    Thanks for bringing me memories of a place I haven’t visited for some time.

    August 13, 2012 at 7:30 pm

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