Adventures in hiking…

Yosemite In The Spring – Part I

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Vernal Falls, May 2012

When my friend asked me to go camping in Yosemite this spring, it took about two seconds to say yes.  Each season in this place promises to provide a different perspective on the ever-changing landscape.  This was an opportunity to hang out with him and his family and do a few day hikes in the valley.  With the upcoming Memorial Day holiday, the campsites were full.  These things fill up quickly with all variety of campers.  From ultralight tents like mine, to tent-condos and vintage RVs, you will see them all.  Not one to enjoy being around throngs of people, I found the car camping experience in the Upper Pines Campground to be very decent.  Most people are good neighbors and obey the multitude of rules.  Other than the 0730 trash trucks, it was fairly peaceful.

Merced River & Vernal Falls

Pollen is abundant in the valley and the conifers were producing it in vast amounts.  Hay fever sufferers, beware – get your shots and/or bring your antihistamines with you.  Diligence with your food and toiletries is required while camping here as the vermin are quite adept at the snatch and grab, especially the ravens and squirrels.  My friends watched as a squirrel disappeared under a neighbors truck with the doors open;  the rascal emerged with food in a matter of seconds.  He went right for the boxed graham crackers, found the bag, eaten through the box and extracted his morsels before they knew what hit them.  I love animals, but thought back to what I would have done as a kid in this campground.  A sling shot would have been awesome.

At night, the muted roar of the Merced River beckoned me as I drifted off to sleep that first night.  Soon, I would venture out with my friends on a trek to Nevada Falls via the Mist Trail.  Having done this cardio extravaganza in the fall of 2010, I was excited to see the volume of water during the spring snow melt.  I read in the Backpackers magazine that 90% of hikers hike only 10% of the trails in Yosemite.  Well, I think that 99% of the visitors to Yosemite hang out in the valley and then go to Vernal Falls.  Crowds aside, the steady climb up to Vernal is rewarded with the drenching mist probably similar to Niagara.  The granite steps would give a stair-master competition.  The one thing that kept me going was the humility of having an old person pass me up on the steps.  At the top, the volume of water is near flood stage compared to the previous fall flow that I witnessed.

Nevada Falls

The trail continued up to Nevada where you cross the Merced and I was in awe of the speed of the water as it rushed through a shallow granite track into a 90 degree curve.  The sheer power of the current is amazing.  You get a respite from the incline and then start a steep ascent over the manmade steps.   This section of the trail is a testament to the trail builders over the years.  The huge slabs are cut and fit together like a puzzle.

Looking west from Nevada Falls.

Nevada Falls was busy, but there was plenty of room to spread out.  This cascade seems even more powerful than Vernal because the water is funneled through a crevice that is maybe 6-8 ft. across.   The roar and subsequent plunge is impressive.  Glacier Point fills the western vista and hawks lazily glided around the nearby Liberty Cap.  Even with all the people, it was peaceful to lay back and take it all in.

Nevada Falls from the John Muir Trail

The walk down the John Muir Trail is always a treat.  As you progress down, you get quick showers from above and obtain postcard views of Half Dome, Liberty Cap and Nevada Falls.   This is a shared trail and we encountered a couple of riders on a mule and quarter horse.  It can get slippery as the sand covered rocks keep you alert as you try to prevent rolling your ankles.  We returned via the JMT to the Mist Trail down to the valley floor.

At just under 7 miles, this loop is a good workout, full of killer views.  Due to the crowds in the spring, I would recommend a late start – like after 1 or 2 in the afternoon.   The risk with an afternoon hike is the occasional thunderstorm. Most  people start up around 0900.  Half Dome bound hikers pass by this way and it’s worth the stop.

Wow

God certainly knew what he was doing when he created this place.  It’s best enjoyed with family and friends.

2 responses

  1. I agree…God sure knew how to do it well!

    August 25, 2012 at 5:36 am

  2. Oh my goodness! Incredible article dude! Thank you, However I am going through problems with your RSS.
    I don’t understand why I can’t join it. Is there anybody else getting identical RSS issues?
    Anyone that knows the answer can you kindly respond?

    Thanks!!

    August 7, 2013 at 12:55 am

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